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My Strategies for Quitting Soda

For the past three months I have struggled to quit soda drinking. My addiction to this soft drink started many years ago when I was still a child. My parents would buy a lot of it and stock it in the refrigerator. Whenever they saw me drinking water especially on a hot evening, they would always remind me that there was some cold drink in the refrigerator. They did not believe that taking water alone was healthy. Instead, they thought that the sweetened drink was necessary if i was to remain energetic throughout the day. Initially, I was used to drinking unsweetened beverages that primarily included tea and coffee. With time, however, i developed a craving for soda and the regular drinks that I was initially accustomed to became increasingly tasteless and bitter. As I became more exposed to soda, I developed an attitude that sugary drinks were indeed better. As a result, I developed a preference for them to the extent that I could not now drink unsweetened coffee or tea. Over the years that followed, I struggled to quick soda especially after learning about its detrimental effects to my health. The process was challenging. However, I knew that if I could make it past the initial stages of withdrawal, it would be possible for me to overcome my nesting cravings.

After my first attempts to quit drinking soda provide unsuccessful, I knew I had to become more serious about what I wanted. I took some time to identify the reasons I wanted to quit this habit. Apart from reviewing the leading negative effects of excessive consumption of soda, I came up with valuable motivation that helped me become more determined. After considering each of the health consequences of drinking, I decided that there was need to avoid that I am in good health at all times so that twenty years from now, my family does not spend all the resources it has on taking care of me. My Strategies for Quitting Soda

My last attempt to quit soda was not easy. Initially, different withdraw effects weighed heavily on me. I felted persistent headaches that made my life miserable. At times I felt anxious and it became increasingly difficult for me to concentrate in class work. These changes did not worry me so much because I understood that the symptoms I was experiencing were as a result of caffeine withdrawal. Moreover, I began taking some coffee in addition to green tea that served as a source of caffeine during my transition. At one point, I went to see a doctor. After explaining my situation, he gave me some B vitamins that helped to a great extent ease the symptoms I was experiencing.

Juliano, L. M., & Griffiths, R. R. (2004). A critical review of caffeine withdrawal: empirical validation of symptoms and signs, incidence, severity, and associated features. Psychopharmacology, 176(1), 1-29.

Since I was already aware that the withdraw symptoms I was experiencing were primarily as a result of caffeine, I had to put in place effective strategies to manage caffeine withdrawal.

hough reports of caffeine withdrawal in the medical literature date back more than 170 years, the most rigorous experimental investigations of the phenomenon have been conducted only recently. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review and analysis of the literature regarding human caffeine withdrawal to empirically validate specific symptoms and signs, and to appraise important features of the syndrome. A literature search identified 57 experimental and 9 survey studies on caffeine withdrawal that met inclusion criteria. The methodological features of each study were examined to assess the validity of the effects. Of 49 symptom categories identified, the following 10 fulfilled validity criteria: headache, fatigue, decreased energy/activeness, decreased alertness, drowsiness, decreased contentedness, depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, irritability, and foggy/not clearheaded. In addition, flu-like symptoms, nausea/vomiting, and muscle pain/stiffness were judged likely to represent valid symptom categories. In experimental studies, the incidence of headache was 50% and the incidence of clinically significant distress or functional impairment was 13%. Typically, onset of symptoms occurred 12-24 h after abstinence, with peak intensity at 20-51 h, and for a duration of 2-9 days. In general, the incidence or severity of symptoms increased with increases in daily dose; abstinence from doses as low as 100 mg/day produced symptoms. Research is reviewed indicating that expectancies are not a prime determinant of caffeine withdrawal and that avoidance of withdrawal symptoms plays a central role in habitual caffeine consumption. The caffeine-withdrawal syndrome has been well characterized and there is sufficient empirical evidence to warrant inclusion of caffeine withdrawal as a disorder in the DSM and revision of diagnostic criteria in the ICDMy Strategies for Quitting Soda

 

 

Scientifically, the answer probably has to do with two things: (1) sugar; (2) caffeine. These two combined – along with the wonderful carbonated fizzyness – provide for a drinking experience that is a delight to the senses and provides a bit of a sugar/caffeine high to boot.

 

 

 

Scientifically, the answer probably has to do with two things: (1) sugar; (2) caffeine. These two combined – along with the wonderful carbonated fizzyness – provide for a drinking experience that is a delight to the senses and provides a bit of a sugar/caffeine high to boot.

 

Be persistent.

When you first quit drinking sodas and diet sodas, you might experience withdrawal symptoms – headaches, anxiety, mood swings, or inability to concentrate. Some of these symptoms may be purely related to a caffeine withdrawal. Try drinking tea or green tea (with caffeine) or take B vitamins to help ease your symptoms. Remember, these withdrawal symptoms are temporary and will generally subside within a week, so don’t give up on giving up the sodas.

My Strategies for Quitting Soda

 

Scientifically, the answer probably has to do with two things: (1) sugar; (2) caffeine. These two combined – along with the wonderful carbonated fizzyness – provide for a drinking experience that is a delight to the senses and provides a bit of a sugar/caffeine high to boot.

Another aspect to soda “addiction” (a term I’ll use loosely here) is dietary training. We grow up in a world where: a burger, friends and a soda are presented as a norm. Or we go out for pizza and…soda. Or you grab tacos, burritos, nachos and…soda. You go to the movies and grab popcorn and…soda. We are trained to pair soda with every meal from an early age.

When you embrace soda as the defacto drink with every meal from an early age – it makes it real hard to break the habi

 

 

 

These powerful addictive properties may make it challenging to quit these unhealthful thirst-quenchers. However, make it past the initial period of withdrawal and you should be able to leave these nasty cravings behind. The process may appear daunting, but it can be done, and your body will thank you. Here’s what you need to remember:

 

My Strategies for Quitting Soda

While there are many unsweetened beverages like coffee and tea available, some of us have intense craving for sugary drinks, making regular beverages seem tasteless and bitte

 

I don’t remember when my soda habit started—that’s how young I was when I took my first sip. I’ve always loved the sweetness and the fizziness. And that crisp feeling of the bubbles as they went down my throat.

Growing up, I only drank water when one of my parents suggested I have a glass. Why would I drink water when I could have grape, orange, or strawberry soda? The yummy possibilities seemed endless

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abdel Rahman, A., Jomaa, L., Kahale, L. A., Adair, P., & Pine, C. (2017). Effectiveness of behavioral interventions to reduce the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition reviews, 76(2), 88-107.

 

 

 

 

 

Xavier, R., Sreeramanan, S., Diwakar, A., Sivagnanam, G., & Sethuraman, K. R. (2007). Soft drinks and hard facts: A health perspective. ASEAN Food Journal, 14(2), 69

 

 

Kassem, N. O., Lee, J. W., Modeste, N. N., & Johnston, P. K. (2003). Understanding soft drink consumption among female adolescents using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Health Education Research, 18(3), 278-291.

 

 

Liu, Y., Lopez, R. A., & Zhu, C. (2014). The impact of four alternative policies to decrease soda consumption. Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, 43(1), 53-68.

 

 

https://www.menshealth.com/weight-loss/a21346165/how-to-quit-drinking-soda/