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Lesson Plan                               

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal is to promote the ability of the students to read and write using proper and accurate sentences regarding this week’s reading (Charlotte’s Web) in simple and plain paragraphs that outline the summary and stylistic devices.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Evince the ability to read at least one paragraph in the text with correct pronunciation.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the themes and stylistic devices utilized in Charlotte’s Web.
  • Demonstrate the ability to incorporate extracted vocabulary and stylistic devices from Charlotte’s Web in the summaries about the text.
  • Evince the ability to recognize correct and incorrect punctuation of sentences with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to re-correct sentences constructed by other students with 90% accuracy of punctuation and grammar.

Rationale:

The target students for this lesson and course in general are lower intermediate ESL students who have Arabic backgrounds. In this lesson, the students will take turns to read a chosen excerpt from this week’s reading, that is, Charlotte’s Web from which their ability to read accurately will be assessed. This lesson also aims at integrating reading and writing in that the students will give a brief summary of their understanding of the text, as well as, stylistic devices and themes from the storyline. I expect the students to incorporate some of these themes and devices in their written summaries and also assess each other’s reading in class as they take turns to read the excerpt.

Lesson Materials-lesson Plan 

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Coloured Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

Note: It is vital to note that at this juncture, the teacher needs to encourage the students to speak freely devoid of fear so as to foster active social interaction in the class amongst themselves and the teacher.

Reading Activities 30

Minutes

·         Provide the students with the pre-selected or pre-chosen excerpt from Charlotte’s Web and ask them to take turns reading it.

·         Ask the students to identify the punctuation marks used in the sentences and incorporate them in how they read the text.

·         Let the students find mistakes in how the colleagues read the excerpt and provide corrections where necessary.Lesson Plan 

·         Ask the students to identify the themes used in the Charlotte’s Web, as well as, the stylistic devices employed by the author in both the excerpt and the book as a whole.

·         While performing this task, ask the students to identify any corrections in the themes and stylistic devices found and explained by their colleagues.

·         Afterward, the students can provide appropriate corrections to the identified mistakes and suggestions in a respectful manner, that is, without looking down on their colleagues or chastising them for their mistakes.

·         Following the corrections, the students are to re-read the excerpt in the correct manner that entails correct pronunciation of English words and incorporates punctuation marks in the reading, for instance, pausing where there is a comma or period at the middle and end of sentences respectively.

Note: The pre-selected excerpt meets the needs of the students in terms of learning proper reading of English sentences and identifying punctuation marks, themes and stylistic devices used in the book.

Writing Activity 30

Minutes

·         Allow the students to write summaries of their understanding of the excerpt and the book as a whole. This can be done before and during the class.

·         Students to also provide additional writing about the use of themes and stylistic devices in the excerpt and Charlotte’s Web as a whole.

·         All writings by the students will be done in their notebooks which the teacher can review at a later time.

·         Allow the students to explain how the excerpt applies in their real lives in writing.

Note: Charlotte’s Web can be an ideal model for helping students read and write in English while also aiding in their utilization of certain words to process writing.

Break Time 15

Minutes

Lesson Plan 
Review      35

Minutes

·         Following the break, students should review each other’s written summaries and explanations of themes and stylistic devices used in the text and provide their colleagues with both written and oral feedbacks.

·         The teacher to make appropriate corrections where necessary as the students conduct the reviews and provide written and oral feedbacks.

·         The teacher asks the students to put away their handouts and books and take part in an open discussion on particular instances where certain pronunciations of English words, themes, punctuation marks and stylistic devices are preferred depending on the preceding and following content of the sentence.

·         Students to participate in the discussion initiated by the teacher.

·         Students to ask any questions about points not understood in class.

                                   

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

So as to ensure that the students obtain maximum benefit from the class, I will provide the students with certain pointers before and during the class that can help guide the students towards correct English reading and writing techniques. Therefore, I will elaborate and deliberate explanations in areas I feel that the students have not discerned the proper way of articulating words, incorporating punctuation marks into their reading and writing or identifying grammatical and punctuation mistakes in the written summaries and discussions. I feel that the lesson will be a success only if all the students have met the objectives and requirements of the class and this can only be attained when I incessantly encourage active social interaction and participation by every student.

Assessment: The pre-selected and modified excerpt will be an informal way of assessing or evaluating the performance of the students in this class, as well as, their progress in reading fluently in English and writing accurately in English.

Lesson Plan week 3

Lesson Goals:Lesson Plan 

  • The main goal is to promote the ability of the students to read and write using proper and accurate sentences regarding this week’s reading (The Old Man and the Sea) in simple and plain paragraphs that outline the summary and stylistic devices.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Show the ability to read at least one paragraph in the text with correct pronunciation.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the themes and stylistic devices utilized in
  • Demonstrate the ability to incorporate extracted vocabulary and stylistic devices from The Old Man and the Sea in the summaries about the text.
  • Showcase their ability to recognize correct and incorrect punctuation of sentences with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to re-correct sentences constructed by other students with 90% accuracy of punctuation and grammar.

Rationale: Lesson Plan 

In this lesson, the students will take turns to read a chosen excerpt from this week’s reading, that is, The Old Man and the Sea from which their ability to read accurately will be evaluated. The objective of this lesson is to build on the reading and writing skills learnt in the previous class by providing the lower intermediate ESL students with some of the crucial conjunctions that can be utilized in joining the statements and sentences in written form. Moreover, this lesson aims to develop the students’ performance in reading and writing through better incorporation of themes and stylistic devices used in the text in their written summaries and identification of mistakes by exposure to open debates and assessment and correction of each other’s reading and writing.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Coloured Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Ask the students what they know about the old man (Santiago), the young boy and the fish.

·         Allow the students to freely speak about the characters and what they liked and disliked about their roles, behaviors and traits.

NB: The teacher has to encourage the students to speak freely and without of fear so as to enhance active social interaction in the class amongst themselves and the teacher.

Reading

&

Writing Activities

30

Minutes

·         Provide the students with the pre-selected or pre-chosen excerpt from The Old Man and the Sea and ask them to take turns reading it.

·         Ask the students to identify the punctuation marks used in the sentences and incorporate them in how they read the text.

·         Let the students find mistakes in how the colleagues read the excerpt and provide corrections where necessary.

·         Ask the students to identify the themes used in the The Old Man and the Sea, as well as, the stylistic devices employed by the author in both the excerpt and the book as a whole.

·         While performing this task, ask the students to identify any corrections in the themes and stylistic devices found and explained by their colleagues.

·         Afterward, the students can provide appropriate corrections to the identified mistakes and suggestions in a respectful manner, that is, without looking down on their colleagues or chastising them for their mistakes.

·         Following the corrections the students are to re-read the excerpt in the correct manner that entails correct pronunciation of English words and incorporates punctuation marks in the reading, for instance, pausing where there is a comma or period at the middle and end of sentences respectively.

Writing Activity 30

Minutes

·         Allow the students to write summaries of their understanding of the passage and the book as a whole. This can be done before and during the class.

·         Students to also provide additional writing about the use of themes and stylistic devices in the passage and The Old Man and the Sea as a whole.

·         All writings by the students will be done in their notebooks which the teacher can review at a later time.

·         Allow the students to explain how the passage applies in their real lives in writing.

Break Time 15

Minutes

Review and Analysis      35

Minutes

·         After the break, students should review each other’s written summaries and explanations of themes and stylistic devices used in the text and provide their colleagues with both written and oral feedbacks.

·         The teacher to make appropriate corrections where necessary as the students conduct the reviews and provide written and oral feedbacks.

·         The students are also expected to answer to answer questions about the text written by the teacher on the whiteboard in their worksheets. .

·         Students to ask any questions about points not understood in class.

Contingency Plan:

So as not to mislead the class and ensure that each student benefits from the class in terms of improving their reading and writing skills, I will encourage and faster articulation or words while providing appropriate input and corrections where necessary. In addition, I will design certain exercises in the form of written questions on the white board so as to enable the students to familiarize themselves with an exam situation whereby questions are not asked by the teacher, but written on question papers instead. This will ensure that the students get used to an exam situation and how to go about it as early as possible.

Assessment:Lesson Plan 

The pre-selected and modified excerpt will be an informal way of assessing or evaluating the performance of the students in this class, as well as, their progress in reading fluently in English and writing accurately in English, with the formal way being the answers to questions they provide in their worksheets.

                                                          Lesson Plan week 4                                        

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal is to sharpen the students’ English reading and writing skills using proper and accurate sentences regarding this week’s reading (The Giver) in simple and plain paragraphs that outline the summary and stylistic devices, as well as, description of their applications in other situations.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Show the ability to read at least one paragraph in the text with correct pronunciation.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the themes and stylistic devices utilized in The Giver.
  • Demonstrate the ability to incorporate extracted vocabulary and stylistic devices from The Giver in the summaries about the text.
  • Showcase their ability to recognize correct and incorrect punctuation of sentences with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to re-correct sentences constructed by other students with 90% accuracy of punctuation and grammar.

Rationale: Lesson Plan 

Since this lesson is meant to sharpen English reading and writing skills, I anticipate that all students will be able to read the pre-selected excerpt from this week’s reading, that is, The Giver with fluently and faster without regular repetition of words or prolonged pausing due to difficulty in articulating words. This will be the final assessment of reading skills of students. Thus, students are expected to evince good mastery of articulation and diction. Another vital objective of this lesson is to assess the comprehension of grammar, tense, parts of speech such as nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs and punctuation in English as demonstrated by the students through their writing activities and exercises. Scaffolding ladder technique will also be utilized in this lesson to aid students in forming descriptive paragraphs for personal encounters in relation with the class content.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Coloured Markers
  • The Giver books

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson and ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout, as well as, convey matters arising from the previous class.

·         Ask students what they understand about giving.

·         Ask the students what they know about Jonas and his group.

·         Allow the students to freely speak about the characters and what they liked and disliked about their roles, behaviors and traits in the storyline

·         Write on the whiteboard on each mentioned noun, verb, adjective and adverb mentioned in the descriptions and opinions provided by the students.

Reading

Activities

30

Minutes

·         Provide the students with the pre-selected or pre-chosen excerpt from The Giver and ask them to take turns reading it.

·         Ask the students to identify the punctuation marks used in the sentences and incorporate them in how they read the text.

·         Ask the students to identify the themes used in the The Giver, as well as, the stylistic devices utilized by the author in both the excerpt and the book as a whole.Lesson Plan 

·         Commend the students for their reading and only provide reading improvement tips.

·         Afterward, the students can provide feedback regarding the reading exercise and how their reading has changed or improved since reading classes were started two weeks ago.

·         Provide advice appropriate to each student based on their feedback.

Writing Activity 30

Minutes

·         Allow the students to write summaries of their understanding of the excerpt and the book as a whole. This can be done before and during the class.

·         Students to also provide additional writing about the use of themes and stylistic devices in the passage and The Giver as a whole.

·         All writings by the students will be done in their notebooks which the teacher can review at a later time.

·         Allow the students to explain how the excerpt and the book as a whole apply to discordant situations in their real lives in writing.

Break Time 15

Minutes

Lesson Plan 
Review and Analysis      35

Minutes

·         After the break, the teacher will review the students’ written summaries and explanations of themes and stylistic devices used in the text.

·         The teacher to make appropriate corrections where necessary as the students conduct the reviews and provide written and oral feedbacks.

·         The students are also expected to answer to answer questions about the text written by the teacher on the whiteboard in their worksheets and also fill the boxes or blanks in the worksheet with various nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs.

·         Students to ask any questions about points not understood in class.

 

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

So that the students do not confuse what parts of speech such as nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs, pronouns, interjections, conjunctions and prepositions are, I will provide general explanations or descriptions of what they entail and give examples so that they get a clear picture before embarking on the class exercise.

Assessment:

The pre-selected and modified excerpt will be an informal way of evaluating the performance of the students in this class, as well as, their progress in reading fluently in English and writing accurately in English. On the other hand, formal assessment will take the form of written answers to questions, as well as, filling in of blanks and boxes in the worksheets based on the instructions.

Lesson Plan Week 5

Lesson Goals:

  • The main objective of this lesson is to help the students grasp the concept of punctuation in English and learn how to apply punctuation marks such as periods, colons, semi-colons, commas, quotation marks and apostrophes in sentences.

Objectives:Lesson Plan 

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to identify and properly utilize common punctuation marks with 90% accuracy
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify punctuation mistakes in sentences and rewrite these sentences using the correct punctuation marks with 90% accuracy.
  • Edit sentences that contain dialogues for capitalization and punctuation errors.

Rationale:

In this lesson, lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to discordant sentences that have different punctuation marks so that they can get an idea of how punctuation marks are utilized in sentences and how they are critical to the meaning conveyed by the sentences. In as much as this lesson will improve the English reading and writing skills of the students, knowing the impact that proper punctuation has on the meaning of sentences is tantamount to achievement of the main goal of this lesson. In addition, this lesson will also instil the basic concepts of editing in the minds of the students so that they can correct sentences with punctuation errors.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Markers
  • Workshee

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Explain to the students that punctuation is the utilization of marks to make the meanings of sentences in English clearer.

·         Have the students say some of the punctuation marks that they already know.

·         Summarize this task by noting that capitalization and punctuation provide vital information to the reader and explain further using the metaphor of traffic signals, that is, sentences and ideas are like cars and the capitalization and punctuation are like road surface markings and traffic signals.

Teacher modelling/Explicit Instruction 30

Minutes

·         Write a few non-punctuated sentences on the whiteboard. For instance: She went to the park yesterday I had a wonderful time What did you do today

·         Ask the students to suggest ways of punctuating the sentences.

·         Explain to the students that as writers, they should incessantly focus on word choice, style, concepts, description, as well as, other big concepts of writing which are important in editing.

·         Demonstrate how editing symbols are utilized, for example, putting two lines under a lowercase letter that requires capitalization and circling a spelling error.

Interactive modelling/Guided practice 30

Minutes

·         After the explicit instruction, take the students through the Punctuation Green Light, Red Light activity. See Appendix A.

·         Ensure the activity instructions are followed as closely as possible.

Break 10 Minutes  
Independent Working Time 20

Minutes

·         Hand out copies of An Aesop’s Fable to each student. See Appendix B.

·         Follow the instructions outlined. Notwithstanding, instead of working with each student on a one-on-one basis, have the students form groups.

·         Oversee the activity once with each group. Every time you visit a group, ensure that other groups read the book on their own while you are concentrating on the group you are visiting.

·         Once the students are done with the activity, have them work on the Punctuation Match-up worksheet. See Appendix B.

·         Have students exchange their worksheets.

·         Utilizing the editing symbols on the whiteboard as a reference point, have the students read their classmate’s work and make editing recommendations.

Assessment      10

Minutes

·         Write some incorrectly-punctuated sentences on the whiteboard.

·         Ask the students to proofread the sentences. Every time a student makes a suggestion, ask him or her to explain the reason why the alteration needs to be made.

·         Assess or evaluate the students’ understanding of the lesson based on their answers.

Review and Analysis 10

minutes

·         Review the correct ways of using punctuation marks such as periods, colons, semi-colons, commas, quotation marks, exclamation point and apostrophes in sentences.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

In order not to mislead the class, I prepared an understandable or relatable analogy or metaphor to help the students understand punctuation, with the metaphor being traffic lights. Moreover, I employed tried and tested games that have proved to be effective in helping students grasp the concepts of punctuation in English reading and writing.

Assessment

The incorrectly-punctuated sentences will be a way of assessing the understanding of the students regarding punctuation and its use in sentences. In addition, the recommendations made by the students in relation to the work done by their classmates will be a way of assessing the editing skills learned by the students from the lesson.

Lesson Plan week 6

Lesson Goals:Lesson Plan 

The main goal of this lesson is to help the students comprehend the concepts of letter writing for both formal and formal letters, as well as, replying formal and informal letters received to them.

Objectives:

  • The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:
  • Showcase the ability to identify formal and informal letters.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write formal and informal letters with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to reply to formal and informal letters received by them with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can identify both formal and informal letters and differentiate the two, as well as, write their own formal and informal letters and reply to letters sent to them. Based on this understanding, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to discordant letters used for different purposes be it letters sent by the government, letters from the workplace, letters from family and friends and invitation letters among others so that they can see the difference between formal and informal letters. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to distinguish between formal letters and informal letters and write both letters with all the requirements without experiencing substantial difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Coloured Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Explain to the students what letters mean and their purpose.

·         Have they students briefly explain what they already know about letter writing.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about letter writing.

Lecture 30

Minutes

·         Give a broad explanation of the meaning of formal letters and informal letters and the specific prerequisites of each letter, particularly the mandatory address, salutation and endings of both formal and informal letters.

·         Write a formal and informal invitation letter on the white board inviting the students to a dinner party at your house and explain the differences in the formats of the letters. See Appendix A and Appendix B.

·         Demonstrate how letters are enveloped and sent to the receiver.

·         Demonstrate how the students should reply the letters received by them and distinguish the difference between formal and informal replies.

Work Activity 30

Minutes

·         Distribute copies of sample letters sent by the government, letters from the workplace, letters from family and friends and invitation letters among others among the students.

·         Ask the students to work in person to try and distinguish whether the letters are formal or informal.

·         Students to give reasons why they think the letter is formal or informal using the letter terminology explained by the teacher earlier.

·         Students to read some of the letters so that they can also get the oral difference in formal and informal letters.

Break Time 10

Minutes

 

Writing letter

     30

Minutes

·         After the brief break, allow the students to focus on the structures formal and informal letters and have them in mind.

·         Ask the students to write succinct letters of not more than five short sentences as the body in both formal and informal formats to the school administration and friends or families respectively.

·         Students to demonstrate how to put the letters in the envelopes and the channels they will use to send the letters to the receiver.

NB: Students are free to choose any social context of their liking while writing the informal letters to friends and families.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Review the correct way of writing formal letters and informal letters in terms of their structure or format.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

So as not to mislead the class, I will employ a step-by-step technique in explaining the structure or format of a formal letter, as well as, that of an informal letter. This method is vital since it will any doubt, misunderstanding or difficulties that the students may have in identifying and writing formal and informal letters. In a situation whereby I felt that any student may not have understood a concept due to for example, a fast class activity, I will repeat the exercise or activity so that all concepts of letter writing are grasped and applied by the students at the end of this lesson.

Assessment:

The copies of letters sent by the government, letters from the workplace, letters from family and friends and invitation letters among others distributed in class will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between formal and informal letters. The letter writing exercise to the school administration and their families or friends will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of formal and informal letter writing by writing their own correct letters. The students can also apply the Krashen’s affective filter in groups for review purposes without the involvement of the teacher.

                                                    

Lesson Plan Week 7

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand comprehensively the concepts of email writing for both formal and informal emails, as well as, replying the formal and informal emails received by them.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to identify formal and informal emails.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write formal and informal emails with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to reply to formal and informal emails received by them with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can identify both formal and informal emails and distinguish between the two, as well as, write their own formal and informal emails and reply to emails sent to them. Based on this understanding, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to discordant emails utilized for discordant purposes be it emails sent by the government, emails from the workplace, emails from family and friends and invitation emails among others so that they can see the difference between formal and informal emails. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to distinguish between formal emails and informal emails and write both emails with all the requirements without facing substantial difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Markers
  • Laptop

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Have they students briefly explain what they already know about email writing.

·         Ask the students how they write the emails they send and the last time they sent emails to people or companies.

·         Explain to the students what emails mean and their purpose.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about email writing.

Lecture about emails 30

Minutes

·         Give a broad explanation of the meaning of formal emails and informal emails and the specific prerequisites of each email, particularly the mandatory address, salutation and endings of both formal and informal emails.

·         Write a formal and informal invitation email on the white board inviting the students to a dinner party at your house and explain the differences in the formats of the emails. See Appendix A and Appendix B. Have soft copies of these emails to send to students at the end of the lesson.

·         Demonstrate how emails are sent to the receiver.

·         Demonstrate how the students should reply the emails received by them and distinguish the difference between formal and informal replies.

        Work

Activity

30

Minutes

·         Distribute copies of sample emails sent by the government, emails from the workplace, emails from family and friends and invitation emails among others among the students.

·         Ask the students to work in person to try and distinguish whether the emails are formal or informal.

·         Students to give reasons why they think the email is formal or informal using the email terminology explained by the teacher earlier.

·         Students to read some of the emails so that they can also get the oral difference in formal and informal emails.

Break Time 10 mins
 

Writing Email

     30

Minutes

·         After the brief break, allow the students to focus on the structures formal and informal emails and have them in mind.

·         Ask the students to write succinct emails of not more than five short sentences as the body in both formal and informal formats to the school administration and friends or families respectively.

·         Students to demonstrate how to send emails with and without attachments.

NB: Students are free to choose any social context of their liking while writing the informal emails to friends and families.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Review the correct way of writing formal emails and informal emails in terms of their structure or format.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

In order not to mislead the class, I will collect various samples of emails from the internet so that the students can be identify formal emails and informal emails effectively and distinguish between the two in various contexts, not just the usual student emails, schools emails, company email and government emails. To reinforce this point practically, I will write sample emails on the whiteboard so that I can take the students through a step-by-step process of writing and sending emails.

Assessment:

The copies of emails sent by the government, emails from the workplace, emails from family and friends and invitation emails among others distributed in class will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between formal and informal emails. The email writing exercise to the school administration and their families or friends will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of formal and informal email writing by writing their own correct emails.

 

Lesson Plan 

 

Midterm Exam (Week 8)

Name: ___________________________     Signature: _____________________

Total Grade: ______ out of 30

Exam Duration:  90 minutes

General Test Instructions: Read each section carefully and understand the instructions before proceeding to answer the questions. The test will be undertaken in a duration of 90 minutes with no additional time. Ensure that you have completed the entire exam within the allocated time. The answers should not only be vivid but also understandable. You can use a pencil, pen or both in this test.

Section 1: Grammar Test (10 Points)   (Punctuation )

Direction: Read each of these sentences once to the teacher then put the correct punctuation mark, that is, comma, period, question mark, exclamation point, apostrophe, quotation marks and colon in the following sentences. The first example is done for you.

Example: Did Hakim finish the task I gave him to complete (Correctly punctuated sentence: Did Hakim finish the task I gave him to complete?)

  1. The teacher brought fruits such as mangoes oranges bananas and apples to class
  2. Its 6.00 p.m. but the students are yet to arrive in class for today’s lesson
  3. The university offers various degree courses you can consider undertaking including Accounting Education Medicine Engineering Music Economics and Architecture among others.
  4. He kicked the door wide open and slammed the desk That is outrageous
  5. When asked what caused her to be in a melancholic mood, Fatima said, Many children have lost their parents and are forced to live in make shift homes. This saddens me.

Parts of Speech-lesson Plan 

Direction: Read the sentences carefully and identify the parts of speech utilized in the underlined words, that is, adjective, adverb, noun, verb, conjunction, pronoun, preposition or article.

  1. John drove his car down the lane without encountering any
  2. The accident was caused by careless driving; a trait common among drunk
  3. He took his report to the lecturer after class and placed it on the
  4. He came out of the thicket and jumped over the fence.
  5. Jane is a fast writer and can compete well even under immense

Section 2: Letter Writing Test (10 Points)

Formal Letter (5 Points)

Direction: In not more than five sentences as the body of the letter, write a letter to the school administration requesting the recognition of Saudi Arabia Students Association as a formal organization with active members and the subsequent accordance of all benefits enjoyed by other organizations in the school. Ensure that the letter follows the correct format of a formal letter in its addresses, salutation, subject, body and ending remarks. (please write in a separate paper)

Informal Letter (5 Points)Lesson Plan 

Direction: In not more than five sentences as the body of the letter, write a letter to your fellow classmates requesting their support in helping the Saudi Arabia Students Association to be recognized by the school administration as a formal organization. Ensure that the letter follows the correct format of an informal letter in its address, salutation, subject, body and ending remarks. (please write in a separate paper)

 

Section 3: Reading and Writing (10 Points)

Part 1: Excerpt (5 Points)Lesson Plan 

Direction: Read the following excerpt from the book The Giver carefully and answer the questions at the end of the passage.

He listened politely, though not very attentively, while his father took his turn, describing a feeling of worry that he’d had that day at work: a concern about one of the new children who wasn’t doing well. Jonas’s father’s title was Nurturer. He and the other Nurturers were responsible for all the physical and emotional needs of every new child during its earliest life. It was a very important job, Jonas knew, but it wasn’t one that interested him much.

“What gender is it?” Lily asked.

“Male,” Father said. “He’s a sweet little male with a lovely disposition. But he isn’t growing as fast as he should, and he doesn’t sleep soundly. We have him in the extra care section for supplementary nurturing, but the committee’s beginning to talk about releasing him.”

“Oh, no,” Mother murmured sympathetically. “I know how sad that must make you feel.”

Jonas and Lily both nodded sympathetically as well. Release of new children was always sad, because they hadn’t had a chance to enjoy life within the community yet. And they hadn’t done anything wrong.Lesson Plan 

There were only two occasions of release which were not punishment. Release of the elderly, which was a time of celebration for a life well and fully lived; and release of a new child which always brought a sense of what-could-we-have-done. This was especially troubling for the Nurturers, like Father, who felt they had failed somehow. But it happened very rarely.

“Well,” Father said, “I’m going to keep trying. I may ask the committee for permission to bring him here at night, if you don’t mind. You know what the night-crew Nurturers are like. I think this little guy needs something extra.”

“Of course,” Mother said, and Jonas and Lily nodded. They had heard Father complain about the night crew before. It was a lesser job, night-crew nurturing, assigned to those who lacked the interest or skills or insight for the more vital jobs of the daytime hours. Most of the people on the night crew had not even been given spouses because they lacked, somehow, the essential capacity to connect to others, which was required for the creation of a family unit.

“Maybe we could even keep him,” Lily suggested sweetly, trying to look innocent. The look was fake, Jonas knew; they all knew.

“Lily,” Mother reminded her, smiling, “you know the rules.”

Two children- one male, one female- to each family unit. It was written very clearly in the rules.

Lily giggled. “Well,” she said, “I thought maybe just this once.”

 

 

 

 

Answer the following questions:

  1. What is the responsibility of a nurturer as outlined in this passage?

________________________________________________________________________

  1. Why was the release of new children always sad?

________________________________________________________________________

  1. Which two occasions of release were considered not to be a punishment?

________________________________________________________________________

  1. What are some of the shortcomings of night-crew nurturers as described in the passage?

________________________________________________________________________

  1. How many people could be in a family unit as stipulated by the rules?

________________________________________________________________________

Part 2: Short Passage (5 Points)Lesson Plan 

“The cabinet secretary for the education made the suggestion of abolishing the grading system. As I sit here and take stock of my achievements vis a vis those of my peers, the cold, harsh reality is swiftly downing on me. The realization of a disillusioned outcome of four years of higher learning, or is it higher drowning? There is nothing more sincere and hurtful as the grading system.”

“It’s like your entire four years just flashed right in front of you. I mean you have been keeping tabs with your grades every semester, but that first look at an overall grading system is enough to drive numerous knives through your heart. You might even need therapy. One of the things I am proud of though as a person is that I acknowledge my failure even though it seems that such personal interventions are all too frequent.”

 

Write the correct answer for each question. Your sentences should be readable.

The main topic of this passage is……………..

________________________________________________________________________

In the first paragraph, the author realizes that…..

________________________________________________________________________Lesson Plan 

Why does the author think he needs therapy?

________________________________________________________________________What does the author mean by higher drowning?

________________________________________________________________________

What is the overall lesson of the author at the end of the passage?

________________________________________________________________________

Lesson Plan Week 9

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand comprehensively the concepts of research by learning how to write a research proposal and a research paper for academic purposes.

Objectives:Lesson Plan 

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to identify and distinguish between quantitative research and qualitative research.
  • Demonstrate the ability to elaborate the different concepts of both quantitative and qualitative research with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write a quantitative research paper and qualitative research paper with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can identify both quantitative and qualitative research and distinguish between the two, as well as, write their own quantitative and qualitative research papers. Based on this understanding, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different topics and formats of quantitative and qualitative research so that they can determine the difference the two types of research papers. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to distinguish between quantitative research and qualitative research and write both research papers with all the requirements without facing significant difficulties.

Lesson Materials-lesson Plan 

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout containing
  • Colored Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Have they students briefly explain what they already know about research proposal and research writing.

·         Explain to the students what research means.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about research writing.Lesson Plan 

Lecture about research writing 30

Minutes

·         Give a broad explanation of the meaning of quantitative and qualitative research, as well as, the specific prerequisites of each research paper, particularly the title page, abstract, introduction, methodology, results, discussion and references.

·         Write a brief outline of a quantitative research paper and a qualitative research paper on the white board and explain the differences in the formats of the research papers.

·         Demonstrate the process of writing a research paper. See Appendix A.

        Work

Activity

30

Minutes

·         Read out various examples of research topics and their abstracts to the students.

·         Ask the students to work in person to try and distinguish whether the research topics and their abstracts belong to quantitative research papers and a qualitative research papers.

·         Students to give reasons why they think the research topics are quantitative or qualitative.

Break Time 10

Minutes

 

Research Paper Writing

     30

Minutes

·         After the brief break, allow the students to focus on the structures and formats of quantitative research and qualitative research

·         Ask the students to write both quantitative research papers and qualitative research papers of not more than four pages each based on a topic of their choice as an after class assignment.

NB: Students are free to choose any topic of their liking.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Review the correct way of writing quantitative research and qualitative research in terms of their structure or format.

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will write samples of quantitative and qualitative research and allow the students to follow the same format and process while writing their research papers. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficult understanding how to write a proper research paper for academic purposes.

Assessment:Lesson Plan 

The samples of quantitative and qualitative research papers written on the whiteboard will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between quantitative and qualitative research. The research writing assignment will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of quantitative and qualitative research writing by writing their own proper and accurate research papers.

                                                    Lesson Plan Week 10                               

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand comprehensively how to create/write, format and distribute a complete resume and curriculum vitae that accurately represents their experience, skills and educational background.

Objectives:Lesson Plan 

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to examine sample resumes and curriculum vitae and determine the best layout and content
  • Discern comprehensively the nature and purpose of a resume and curriculum vitae.
  • Demonstrate the ability to develop and produce their own resumes or curriculum vitae with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:Lesson Plan 

The lower intermediate ESL students in this class study discordant courses in the institution of higher learning, for instance, Art, Education, Economics and Engineering among others. Thus, it is vital to touch on cross-curricular subjects or topics in this course that students can benefit from irrespective of their fields of study. In this I found the area of job application to be one of the strongest areas wherein the courses overlap and so I designed a lesson plan that would treat the students the experience of mixed expertise. By focussing on the grammatical correctness and layout of the resume and curriculum vitae, as well as, the necessity of having a good resume or curriculum vitae from an academic and employment perspective, the students will be able to create their own personal resumes at the end of the lesson without facing significant difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·      Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·      Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·      Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·      Have they students briefly explain what they already know about resumes and curriculum vitae.

·      Explain to the students what resume and curriculum vitae mean.

·      Write down some of the things the students mentioned about curriculum vitae and resumes.

Lecture about resume/curriculum vitae writing 30

Minutes

·      Begin by discussing what a resume and curriculum vitae are and why they are vital.

·      Proceed to explain who needs a resume/curriculum vitae,

·      Discuss how resume/curriculum vitae have changed with technology, for instance, they are now created using word processing software and submitted via e-mail or the web.

·      Describe what constitutes a good resume, that is, the anatomy of a resume, for instance, contact information, educational background, work experience (employment history), skills and references. See Appendix A.

Work

Activity

30

Minutes

·      Discuss the format, content and layout of a resume and curriculum vitae.

·      Ask the students to suggest some of the Dos and Don’ts of creating a good resume or curriculum vitae.

·      Write the suggestions on the whiteboard and add your own the Dos and Don’ts.

Break Time 10

Minutes

 

Resume/Curriculum Vitae Writing

     30

Minutes

·      After the brief break, display the resume in Appendix B on the whiteboard. Go through the discordant sections and ask the student what they think of the layout, content and format.

·      Display the resume in Appendix C on the whiteboard and compare the content, layout and format to that in Appendix B. Ask the students to decide on the appropriate layout for a resume to use and which includes all the necessary information.

·      Distribute Activity Worksheets 1 and 2 and ask the students to write their own resumes in a first draft, that Activity Worksheet 1 and then make corrections and suggest improvements in Activity Worksheet 2. See Appendix D.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·      Review the correct way of creating a resume and curriculum vitae and remind the class that it is important to continually update their resumes and curriculum vitae.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will display two samples of resumes on the whiteboard and allow the students to study and compare the different formats, contents and layouts and use the correct layout, format and content while writing their own resumes and curriculum vitae. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficult understanding how to create and CV for academic and employment purposes.

Assessment:Lesson Plan 

The samples of resumes displayed on the whiteboard will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between proper and improper resume layout, format and content. The resume writing activity will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of resume and CV writing by creating their own proper and accurate resumes.

                                                         Lesson Plan Week 11                          

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand comprehensively the concepts of essay writing by completing all the pre-writing steps to writing an essay, including graphic organizers, brainstorming, supporting details and outlines, as well as, writing both argumentative and persuasive essays for academic purposes.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to identify and distinguish between argumentative essays and persuasive essays.
  • Demonstrate the ability to elaborate the different concepts of both argumentative essays and persuasive essays with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write argumentative essays and persuasive essays with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:Lesson Plan 

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can identify both argumentative essays and persuasive essays and distinguish between the two, as well as, write their own argumentative essays and persuasive essays. Based on this understanding, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different topics and samples of argumentative essays and persuasive essays so that they can determine the difference the two types of essays. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to distinguish between argumentative essays and persuasive essays and write either argumentative essays or persuasive essays while adhering to all the prerequisites without facing significant difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:Lesson Plan 

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Have they students briefly explain what they already know about essay writing.

·         Explain to the students what essay writing entails.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about essay writing.

Lecture about essay writing 30

Minutes

·         Give a broad explanation of the meaning of argumentative essays and persuasive essays, as well as, the specific prerequisites of each essay, especially the introduction, body and conclusion.

·         Ask the students to reckon about different statements or topics and be prepared to distinguish whether they are argumentative essay topics or persuasive essay topics. See Appendix A.

·         Write a brief outline of argumentative essays and persuasive essays on the white board and explain the differences in the formats of argumentative essays and persuasive essays while demonstrating the process of writing a persuasive essay. See Appendix B.

        Work

Activity

30

Minutes

·         Explain to the students how they need to think when constructing argumentative essays and persuasive essays, that is, make a claim, provide reasons and give at least two pieces of evidence for each reason.

·         Go through brief samples of argumentative essays and persuasive essays on the whiteboard while projecting the writing template worksheets for the class to see and formulate the outline together using concepts from the students.

·         Ask the students to work in small groups or with partners to come up with topics that are either argumentative or persuasive and provide claims, three reasons and two pieces of evidence for their claims. This class activity can be done on the worksheets provided to the students at the beginning of the class.

·         Ask the students to write essays in groups or with their partners based on the topics of their own selection.

NB: Students are free to choose any topic of their liking.

Break Time 10

Minutes

 

Essay Paper Writing

     30

Minutes

·         After the brief break, allow the students to complete their argumentative essays and persuasive essays with special focus on the proper structures and formats of the essays.

·         Ask the students to exchange their essays and go through them to ascertain whether they have been written the correct format and have followed all the prerequisites of argumentative essays and persuasive essays.

·         Circulate the room while the students are reviewing their fellow students’ essays to determine if they are able to identify the claims, reasons and evidences presented in the essays correctly.

·         Ask the students to make appropriate changes to their corrected or reviewed essays and rewrite them in the correct manner or format.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Review the correct way of writing argumentative essays and persuasive essays in terms of their structure or format.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will provide various essay topics and samples of argumentative essays and persuasive essays to help the students understand the main differences and write appropriate essays. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficulty understanding how to write proper argumentative essays and persuasive essays for academic purposes.

Assessment:

The sample topics and samples of argumentative essays and persuasive essays will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between argumentative essays and persuasive essays. The essay writing assignment will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of essay writing by writing their own proper and accurate argumentative essays and persuasive essays.

                                                         Lesson Plan Week 12                          

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand comprehensively the concepts of synopsis writing by completing all the pre-writing steps to writing a synopsis, including reading and re-reading through the text, divide the material to be summarized in discordant parts and write short, informative synopsis or summaries of stories and movies.

Objectives:Lesson Plan 

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Showcase the ability to define synopsis and explain why a synopsis or summary is prominent.
  • Demonstrate the ability to see what the author or the movie is trying to convey stylistically, as well as, any concepts or themes that are interwoven throughout the text or movie clip with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to summarize familiar text with guidance and write a synopsis or summary of the text or movie clip with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:Lesson Plan 

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can discern the concepts of synopsis writing by learning how to write both text summaries and movie summaries. In this regard, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different aspects of synopsis writing through the showing a movie and reading of a text for the students to write summaries of both the movie and the excerpt from The Giver. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to know how to write proper synopses which follow the correct format or flow and adhere to all the concepts of summary writing without facing significant difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Coloured Markers
  • Worksheets

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Have they students briefly explain what they already know about synopsis writing.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about synopsis writing.

·         Introduce the concept of a synopsis to the class. For instance, explain that synopses are discordant from other types of writing in that they are succinct and specific or concise. They provide information regarding things that take place in an event or tale without the use of a lot of detail.

·         Hold up the class reading, that is, The Giver and direct the attention of the students to the back cover. Mention that the writing on the back is an example of a synopsis.

·         Tell the students to ready their pens since they will be writing synopses today.

Lecture about synopsis writing 30

Minutes

·         Play the movie clip on your laptop while projecting it on the whiteboard. For this exercise, use the ending of the movie Frozen as the movie clip since it depicts an event that can be summarized in a few sentences.

·         Remind the class of the purpose of a synopsis. Then provide an example of a two-sentence synopsis for the movie clip. A good example of such as synopsis for the Frozen movie clips is: Anna decided to sacrifice herself for Elsa. This decision broke the frozen curse and set Elsa free. The theme of love and compassion is displayed in this scene.

·         Provide some non-examples to elaborate how not to write a synopsis. For example: The dog and the yellow cat walked across the street. Albeit this is a synopsis, it does not provide a general overview of what is evinced in the clip.

        Work

Activity

30

Minutes

·         Play another clip from the movie Frozen.

·         Give the students thirteen minutes to work in small groups or with partners to come up with four-sentence synopses for the clip. This class activity can be done on the worksheets provided to the students at the beginning of the class.

·         Allow the groups or partners to share their synopses with the rest of the class. Write notes on the whiteboard.

NB: Students have to write synopsis about this specific clip and not provide information not included in the clip given that some may have already watched the entire movie and have more information about it.

Break Time 10

Minutes

 

Synopsis Paper Writing

     30

Minutes

·         After the break, go through brief samples of synopses of texts or books/novels on the whiteboard while projecting the writing template worksheets for the class to see and formulate the outline together.

·         Direct the students to chapter 1 of the book The Giver and project an excerpt from this chapter on the whiteboard. See Appendix A.

·         Ask the students with the book to also refer in their books for the shown excerpt.

·         Ask the students to write four-sentence synopses of the text on their worksheets.

·         As the students complete this activity, walk around and ensure that their synopses are four sentences long at most.

·         The synopses written over the course of this activity can be utilized as pre-assessments for future lessons given that they help determine whether the students fathom concepts such as core ideas or non-vital details.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Ask the students if they reckon all synopses are four sentences log. Also ask why they reckon this activity involved four-sentence synopses.

·         Explain that the purpose of this class activity is to assist them in practising being concise. Remember to reiterate the prominence of conciseness in synopsis writing.

                                                                                                           

Contingency Plan:Lesson Plan 

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will provide various samples of synopses of texts or books/novels on the whiteboard to help the students understand the main concepts so as to write proper synopses. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficulty understanding how to write formidable synopses or summaries for academic purposes.

Assessment:Lesson Plan 

The samples of synopses of texts or books/novels on the whiteboard will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to divide the text to be summarized into a few parts, determine the details in the texts or books that capture the whole story and relay this information in form of a synopsis. The synopsis writing assignment will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to apply the concepts of synopsis writing by writing their own proper and accurate synopses.

Lesson Plan Week 13

Goals and Objectives:

 Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand the basic definitions of referencing and in-text citation, clarify the purpose of referencing and in-text citation, show students how to reference correctly, as well as, how to recognize and employ discordant forms of in-text citations while acknowledging the instance of such within textual examples.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Recognize that information extracted from outside sources must be acknowledged.
  • Showcase the ability to recognize and distinguish different citation formats such as APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago, Turabian, and ASA among others with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to employ the right procedure for citing books, anonymous articles, Internet articles and encyclopaedia articles with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to make proper in-text citations and create a reference or work cited page in writing with 90% accuracy.Lesson Plan 

Rationale:Lesson Plan 

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can discern the concepts of referencing and in-text citation by learning how to cite information obtained from outside sources in the correct format depending on the paper format. In this regard, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different aspects of referencing and in-text citation based on discordant paper formats, that is, APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago, Turabian, and ASA among others. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to know how to make correct in-text citations and create accurate works cited pages depending on the specific paper format and also adhere to all the prerequisites of referencing and in-text citation without facing significant difficulties.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Marker
  • Laptops

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures

 

Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·      Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·      Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·      Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·      Have they students briefly point out what they already know about referencing and in-text citation.

·      Write down some of the things the students mentioned about referencing and in-text citation.

·      Introduce the concept of referencing and in-text citation using the most basic paper formats, that is, APA and MLA. For instance, explain that in-text in citation in APA involves the author(s) surname(s) and the year of publication such as (Scott, 2014) while in-text in citation in MLA, on the other hand, involves the author(s) surname(s) and the page number such as (Scott, 1).

·      Tell the students to ready their pens since they will be writing references and placing in-text citations today.

Lecture about referencing and in-text citation writing 30

Minutes

·      Explain that there are rules regarding how to recognize sources in academic papers through in-text citation by placing an author or source in situations whereby there is no author, along with the page number or year of publication. At the end of the paper, the students should include a Reference or Works Cited page that follows the format of the paper, that is, APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago, Turabian, Oscola and ASA among others.

·      Remind the class of the purpose of referencing and in-text citation by emphasizing the point that failure to provide in-text citation and a reference page is tantamount to plagiarism. Display the picture in Appendix A to provide a visual representation of the repercussions of absence of in-text citations and references for information derived from outside sources.

·      Then provide examples of in-text citation and reference in both APA and MLA paper formats on the whiteboard. See Appendix B.

·      Provide some non-examples to elaborate how not to write references and place in-text citations. For example: The dog and the yellow cat walked across the street (Frozen, 2013) for an MLA citation requirement. Albeit this is a form of in-text citation, it is not the proper way of citing a source in MLA; instead, it is the correct way of citing a source in APA paper format.

Work Activity 30

Minutes

·      Display various samples of sentences with in-text citation and reference or Works Cited pages on the whiteboard.

·      Ask the students to work in small groups or with partners to identify and distinguish the in-text citation and reference styles used in the samples provided. This class activity can be done on the worksheets provided to the students at the beginning of the class.

·      Allow the groups or partners to share their answers with the rest of the class. Write notes on the whiteboard on the responses of the students.

NB: Students have to identify the in-text citation and reference styles used only in the samples provided by the teacher and not any other sentences and references.

Break Time 10

Minutes

Referencing and In-text citation Writing      30

Minutes

·      After the break, go through the samples of in-text citation and references on the whiteboard while projecting the writing template worksheets for the class to see and identify the referencing styles and paper formats together.

·      Direct the students to certain examples of in-text citations and general information on outside sources on the whiteboard. See Appendix C.

·      Ask the students to refer in these examples as they will form their writing assignment for today.

·      Ask the students to write the correct in-text citation style based on the paper format and use the provided general information on sources to write the proper references in APA paper format on their worksheets.

·      As the students complete this activity, walk around and ensure that their answers are correct in terms of recognition of discordant paper formats and correct in-text citation and referencing.

·      The in-text citation identified and references written over the course of this activity can be utilized as pre-assessments for future lessons given that they help determine whether the students fathom concepts such as core ideas or non-vital details.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·      Review the correct way of referencing and placing in-text citation terms of their structure and paper format.

                      

Contingency Plan:

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will provide various samples of references and in-text citations on the whiteboard to help the students understand the main concepts so as to write proper references and place accurate in-text citations in accordance to the paper format. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficulty understanding how to write formidable references and in-text citations for academic purposes.

Assessment:

The samples of references and in-text citations on the whiteboard will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish different paper formats and determine, as well as, use the correct referencing style and in-text citation for APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago, Turabian, and ASA papers among others. The in-text citation identification and reference writing assignment will be a way of evaluating the ability of the students to apply the concepts of referencing and in-text citation by writing their own proper and accurate references and identifying the in-text citations based on paper format and referencing style.

                                                         Lesson Plan Week 14                                      

Lesson Goals:Lesson Plan 

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand the basic concepts of public reading, that is, reading to an audience such as proper pronunciation, skimming and scanning and use of pauses and gestures, as well as, reinforce their comprehension skills through speaking.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Recognize that the different punctuation marks used in the allocated text and incorporate them in their reading of the text publicly.
  • Showcase the ability to recognize and distinguish different vocabulary items present in their selected text for public reading with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to employ the right procedure for reading by first skimming and scanning the text before reading the whole text to the rest of the class with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability to give their opinion regarding the text, that is, whether they agree with the author or not which evinces their comprehension level of the text, as well as, public reading skills.

Rationale:

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can discern the various concepts of public reading or reading to an audience such as skimming and scanning, use of pauses and gestures and incorporation of punctuation marks in their reading. In this regard, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different texts from the same book or assigned class reading which they will read in class unlike in previous lessons whereby all students were given one text to read.  Both academic and social situations require students to have good public reading skills at utmost levels as this is crucial to their interaction with others. Based on this understanding, I planned this reading lesson in order to give my students an opportunity to practice their public reading skills with a comfortable and enjoying audience. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to know how to read to an audience properly while taking into contemplation and applying all the concepts of public reading.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Colored Markers
  • Laptop

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures

 

Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·      Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·      Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·      Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·      Have they students briefly point out what they already know about public reading or reading to an audience.

·      Write down some of the things the students mentioned about public reading.

·      Introduce the basic concept of public reading such as skimming and scanning before-hand and incorporation of gestures, punctuation marks and pauses.

·      Tell the students to ready their assigned texts which are different or unique for every student which they will read loudly to the rest of the class.

NB: Every student should read a different text from the other students from the selected book, that is, no students should read a text from the book that has already been read by another student.

Lecture about public reading or reading to an audience 30

Minutes

·      Explain that there are rules of public reading or reading to an audience that regarding how to recognize punctuation marks that are crucial to pauses and expressions when reading, as well as, diction and proper pronunciation of words that are vital to helping the audience grasp what the speaker is saying swiftly.

·      Remind the class of the purpose of public speaking or reading to the audience by stating that the skills learned through this exercise are crucial to improving communication and interaction between the students and fellow students, teachers and other individuals both in academic and social settings. Display the picture in Appendix A to provide a visual representation of the proper posture that a person should take when reading to an audience or undertaking public reading.

·      Then stand before the class and demonstrate the right that the students should use when reading to the audience or reading publicly so as to avoid making the students strain to hear what they are saying or forced to ask questions in an attempt to get the speaker to repeat what he or she has said.

·      Provide some non-examples to elaborate how not to go about public reading or reading to an audience, for instance, reading while facing down and in a low tone, as well as, holding the text in a straining position and reading too fast.

Work Activity 30

Minutes

·      Go through the right procedure of reading to an audience using the appropriate concepts.

·      Stand before the class and show them how to properly hold the reading material in a situation whereby there is no raised podium for the reader to place the text.

·      Since this lesson involves improving the reading skills of the students in situations whereby there are no aids such as microphones and projected material on the whiteboard, re-emphasize the importance of being audible or being loud enough for the audience to grasp what the student is reading.

·      Explain the importance of skimming and scanning the text before reading it to the audience. This skill is vital since a person can be given a text that he or she has never read before to read to an audience. Thus, proper preparation through skimming and scanning is required in such situations.

·      Take a sample page from the selected text, that is, The Old Man and the Sea and conduct a step-by-step demonstration of the proper way of reading to an audience by going through all the processes and incorporating all the concepts of public reading such as skimming and scanning, punctuation, correct posture, accurate articulation of words, pauses, gestures and being audible enough.

·      Ask the students to take notes that they can use during the reading exercise coming after the break.

Break Time 10

Minutes

Reading to an audience or public reading      30

Minutes

·       After the break, ask the students to take out their books or document versions of the book, The Old Man and the Sea which they will utilize for today’s reading exercise or class activity.

·      Write down the essential concepts of public reading or reading to an audience on the whiteboard so that the students can refer to them before commencing their public reading.

·      For the students who do not have a copy of the book or the document version of the book on their smartphones, tablets or laptops, provide a link that they can use to download the PDF version of the book or simply ask them to borrow from their fellow students for the exercise.

·      Ask each student to read half a page from the selected book. The pages can be randomly selected or following a certain order based on the best method for the students.

·      As the students read various pages of the text, take time to make succinct corrections to their reading while also writing down the pages already read on the whiteboard so that the students do not select the already read pages during their time for reading to the audience.

NB: Students have to utilize the selected text, that is, The Old Man and the Sea in their reading. Moreover, students are expected to read different pages of the selected reading with no two or more students reading from the same page. This is meant to ensure that all students grasp the public concepts comprehensively without simply correcting other students’ reading.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·      Review the correct way of reading to an audience or public reading in terms of the correct concepts and skills of public reading.

                      

Contingency Plan:

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will demonstrate the proper way of reading to an audience or public reading through the incorporation of all the concepts of public reading such skimming and scanning, exemplary diction or articulation of words, expressions that take into account punctuations marks used in the text, as well as, gestures and pauses. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficulty understanding how to read to an audience or read publicly for academic and social purposes.

Assessment:

The samples of reading postures and demonstration of public reading will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between the correct way of reading to an audience and the incorrect way of reading to an audience. The public reading exercise or class activity will be a way of evaluating the ability of the students to apply the concepts of reading to an audience or public reading through their own reading of randomly selected text from the book The Old Man and the Sea while adhering to already taught concepts and rules of public reading.

                                                         Lesson Plan Week 15                                      

Lesson Goals:

  • The main goal of this lesson is to help the students understand the basic concepts of report writing, that is, gathering data through observations, undertaking activities such as internships, interviews and conducting visits, and turning this data into information that is presented in an orderly fashion for the reader to comprehend without difficulty.

Objectives:

The student should be able to complete the following at the end of the class:

  • Recognize that the different ways of collecting data such as observation, participant observation, interviews, research, undertaking projects and conducting visits to buildings or places.
  • Showcase the ability to recognize and distinguish different reports such as academic reports, site visit reports, internship reports and project reports with 90% accuracy.
  • Demonstrate the ability discern and replicate the structure and format of different reports in the class activities and assignment with 90% accuracy.
  • Become familiar with the common phrases and words utilized in the different reports irrespective of whether they formal or informal reports.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write their own reports (site visit reports) while adhering to all the prerequisites and proper structure and format with 90% accuracy.

Rationale:Lesson Plan 

The aim of this lesson is to ensure that the students can discern the various concepts of report writing in discordant contexts, that is, reports based on different activities, subjects, topics, and events. In this regard, the lower intermediate ESL students will be exposed to the different samples of reports and report templates such as site visit reports, historical figures reports and academic reports so as to evince the proper format and structure of the reports and demonstrate how to write various reports appropriately. Reports are applicable in both academic and social settings. Thus, it is vital for the students to grasp the concepts of report writing to be able to write reports for different circumstances or scenarios. Based on this understanding, I planned this report writing lesson to give my students an opportunity to learn and practice report writing. At the end of this lesson, the students will be able to know how to distinguish various reports and write their own reports while taking into consideration and applying all the concepts of report writing.

Lesson Materials

 

  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Handout
  • Samples of reports
  • Laptop

 

Procedures:

Tasks Time Procedures
Warm-up and Introduction         10

Minutes

·         Open the class by distributing the handout containing the lesson objectives and requirements, as well as, the duration.

·         Students look at the handout and familiarize themselves with the content of the lesson.

·         Allow the students to ask any questions about things they do not discern from the handout and raise any matters arising from the previous class.

·         Have the students briefly point out what they already know about report writing.

·         Write down some of the things the students mentioned about report writing.

·         Introduce the basic concepts report writing such as collecting data and the format and structure of reports such as table of contents, introduction, overview of organization, building and historical figure, activities and conclusion.

·         Tell the students to ready their worksheets that they will use for report writing in class.

Lecture about report writing 30

Minutes

·         Start by elaborating to the students that reports are different from academic research papers. Thus, they should not confuse the two. However, mention that certain academic reports have the same structure and format as academic research papers.

·         Remind the class of the purpose of report writing by stating that the skills learned through this exercise are crucial to improving communication and interaction between the students and fellow students, teachers and other individuals both in academic and social settings.

·         Go through the step-by-step process or procedure of writing an academic report using a sample academic report displayed on the whiteboard. See Appendix A.

·         Provide some non-examples to elaborate on how not to go about report writing, for instance, assuming that reports can be written casually or informally.

Work Activity 30

Minutes

·         Display various samples of reports on the whiteboard such as an academic report, report about a historical figure and internship report. See Appendix A.

·         Ask the students to work in small groups or with partners to identify and distinguish the different reports in the samples provided.

·         Allow the groups or partners to share their answers with the rest of the class. Write notes on the whiteboard on the responses of the students.

Break Time 10

Minutes

Writing Reports      30

Minutes

·          After the break, ask the students to take out their worksheets for a report writing exercise.

·         Write down the essential concepts of report writing on the whiteboard so that the students can refer to them before commencing their report writing exercise and while writing their reports.

·         Ask each student to write a brief report about this ESL course describing what they liked about the course, what they disliked about the course and areas where they think the course can improve on its delivery

·         Divide the students into groups and ask them to review the reports written by each student to determine whether they follow the correct format and structure. Go through every group’s review and make necessary corrections.

·         Ask the students to write a site visit report as an assignment using the template in Appendix B.

Review and Analysis 10 Minutes ·         Review the correct way of report writing in terms of their structure and format.

                      

Contingency Plan:

 

In order not to mislead the class or encounter any difficulties, I will demonstrate the proper way of report writing by elaborating all the prerequisites of report writing such as gathering data or information and relaying this information in a report from using the correct structure and format depending on the type of report they are writing. This will ensure that the students do not experience any difficulty understanding how to write reports for academic and social purposes.

Assessment:

The samples of reports will be a way of assessing the ability of the students to distinguish between the correct and incorrect way of writing different reports. The report writing exercise or class activity will be a way of evaluating the ability of the students to apply the concepts of report writing while adhering to already taught concepts and rules of writing reports.

Final Exam ( Final Week 16)

Name: ____________________________________     Signature: _____________________

Total Grade: ______ out of 30                                             Exam Duration:  3 hours

General Test Instructions: Read each section carefully and understand the instructions before proceeding to answer the questions. The test will be undertaken in a duration of 180 minutes with no additional time. Ensure that you have completed the entire exam within the allocated time. The answers should not only be vivid but also understandable. You can use a pencil, pen or both in this test.

Section 1: Reading Test (10 Points)

Direction: Read the following excerpt from the class reading The Old Man and the Sea to the teacher while incorporating all the concepts of public reading. Make sure you are audible enough and assume the right posture while reading.

The boy had given him two fresh small tunas, or albacores, which hung on the two deepest lines like plummets and, on the others, he had a big blue runner and a yellow jack that had been used before; but they were in good condition still and had the excellent sardines to give them scent and attractiveness. Each line, as thick around as a big pencil, was looped onto a green-sapped stick so that any pull or touch on the bait would make the stick dip and each line had two forty-fathom coils which could be made fast to the other spare coils so that, if it were necessary, a fish could take out over three hundred fathoms of line.

Now the man watched the dip of the three sticks over the side of the skiff and rowed gently to keep the lines straight up and down and at their proper depths. It was quite light and any moment now the sun would rise.

The sun rose thinly from the sea and the old man could see the other boats, low on the water and well in toward the shore, spread out across the current. Then the sun was brighter and the glare came on the water and then, as it rose clear, the flat sea sent it back at his eyes so that it hurt sharply and he rowed without looking into it. He looked down into the water and watched the lines that went straight down into the dark of the water. He kept them straighter than anyone did, so that at each level in the darkness of the stream there would be a bait waiting exactly where he wished it to be for any fish that swam there. Others let them drift with the current and sometimes they were at sixty fathoms when the fishermen thought they were at a hundred.

But, he thought, I keep them with precision. Only I have no luck any more. But who knows? Maybe today. Every day is a new day. It is better to be lucky. But I would rather be exact. Then when luck comes you are ready.

Section 2: Writing Tests (15 Points)

Research Proposal Writing (3 Points)

Direction: Fill the following template based on the requirements of research proposal writing. Fill only basic information and not detailed information.

Research Proposal Outline

Topic  
Introduction (Maximum of three sentences)  
Literature Review (Indicate which sources you will use for your research topic)  
Research Methodology (Demonstrate the research methodology you will use for your research topic in terms of data collection, research design and data analysis)  
Rough drought of your research outline  
Conclusion  

Resume/Curriculum Writing (3 Points)

Direction: Use the following template to write a brief resume based on the requirements of resume/curriculum vitae writing. Fill only basic information and not detailed information. Remember, this is your resume, so the information provided should be about you and not another person.

Resume

 

Surname:

 

First Name(s):

 

Sex:      

 

Age:

 

Date of Birth:

 

Address/telephone/email:

 

Nationality:

 

Education:

 

 

 

 

Qualifications:

 

 

 

Work Experience:      

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statement:

 

 

Essay Writing (3 Points)

Persuasive Essay

Direction: Select one of the following essay topics and write a persuasive essay of not more than five sentences about the topic.

  1. School uniforms are beneficial.
  2. Sanctuaries are the key to protecting endangered species and other wildlife.
  3. Islamophobia is a making of the media.
  4. Streaming is the bedrock of content media.

________________________________________________________________________

Argumentative Essay

Direction: Select one of the following essay topics and write an argumentative essay of not more than five sentences about the topic.

  1. Cats are better pets than dogs.
  2. Football is a better sport than tennis.
  3. Beyonce is the best performing artist in the music industry.
  4. An electric vehicle is better than a combustion engine vehicle.

____________________________________________________________________________

Synopsis Writing (3 Points)

Direction: Read the following excerpt from the book The Giver carefully and write a synopsis of not more than five sentences that relay the message of the passage, the plot, as well as, the themes and stylistic devices present in the excerpt if any.

“When I was an Eleven,” his father said now, “as you are, Jonas, I was very impatient, waiting for the Ceremony of Twelve. It’s a long two days. I remember that I enjoyed the Ones, as I always do, but that I didn’t pay much attention to the other ceremonies, except for my sister’s. She became a Nine that year, and got her bicycle. I’d been teaching her to ride mine, even though technically I wasn’t supposed to.”

Jonas laughed. It was one of the few rules that was not taken very seriously and was almost always broken. The children all received their bicycles at Nine; they were not allowed to ride bicycles before then. But almost always, the older brothers and sisters had secretly taught the younger ones. Jonas had been thinking already about teaching Lily.

There was talk about changing the rule and giving the bicycles at an earlier age. A committee was studying the idea. When something went to a committee for study, the people always joked about it. They said that the committee members would become Elders by the time the rule change was made.

Rules were very hard to change. Sometimes, if it was a very important rule -unlike the one governing the age for bicycles- it would have to go, eventually, to The Receiver for a decision. The Receiver was the most important Elder. Jonas had never even seen him, that he knew of; someone in a position of such importance lived and worked alone. But the committee would never bother The Receiver with a question about bicycles; they would simply fret and argue about it themselves for years, until the citizens forgot that it had ever gone to them for study.

His father continued. “So I watched and cheered when my sister, Katya, became a Nine and removed her hair ribbons and got her bicycle,” Father went on. “Then I didn’t pay much attention to the Tens and Elevens. And finally, at the end of the second day, which seemed to go on forever, it was my turn. It was the Ceremony of Twelve.”

Jonas shivered. He pictured his father, who must have been a shy and quiet boy, for he was a shy and quiet man, seated with his group, waiting to be called to the stage. The Ceremony of Twelve was the last of the Ceremonies. The most important.

Report Writing (3 Points)

Historical Figure Report

Direction: Utilize the following template to write a brief historical figure report based on the requirements and concepts of report writing learned in class. Fill only basic information and not detailed information.

 

Name: ____________________________                 Date: _________________________

Historical Figure Report

1.      Full Name of the Historical Figure

___________________________________________________________________

2.      Dates: Birth and Death (if applicable)

___________________________________________________________________

3.      Where were they born? Where did they live?

___________________________________________________________________

4.      Early life information, that is, how did they grow up or their early upbringing?

___________________________________________________________________

5.      Schools attended

___________________________________________________________________

6.      Did the individual endure any struggles in life? Why? How?

___________________________________________________________________

7.      What impact or effect did the historical figure have in your country or society?

___________________________________________________________________

8.      What impressed you most about this historical figure?

___________________________________________________________________

 

Section 2: Referencing and In-text Citation Test (5 Points)

Part 1

Direction: Identify the referencing styles used in these references.

Mitchell, O., Wilson, D., Eggers, A., & MacKenzie, D. (2012). Assessing the effectiveness of

drug courts on recidivism: A meta-analytic review of traditional and non-traditional drug courts. Journal Of Criminal Justice, 40(1), 60-71. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2011.11.009

________________________________________________________________________

Douglas, Mary. Purity And Danger. 1st ed., [Place Of Publication Not Identified], Routledge, 2015,.

________________________________________________________________________

Masters, J 1995, ‘The history of research’, in Action research electronic reader, ed. I

Hughes, viewed 5 April 2004,

<http://www2.fhs.usyd.edu.au/arow/o/m01/m01.htm>.

______________________________________________________________________

Part 2

Direction: Identify the referencing styles used in these in-text citations. Include more than one referencing style in applicable situations

  1. Johnston (2003) claims that there are many factors that are known to affect the success of students at university.

________________________________________________________________________

  1. Mcaine (2002, p. 16) stated that productivity among 69 percent of workers was found to be affected by work related stress.

________________________________________________________________________

  1. McLaine (16) stated that productivity among 69 percent of workers was found to be affected by work related stress.

________________________________________________________________________

  1. There are many factors that are known to affect the success of students at university (Johnston 2003).

________________________________________________________________________

  1. Which referencing style(s) normally uses footnotes for in-text citations?

________________________________________________________________________