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Description

How to stop Smoking Cigarette

Assessment

Based on the behavior assessment, there are certain attributes that point towards a wanting demeanor of smoking. I not only engage in smoking occasionally but also seem to enjoy the experience. Some of the pointers that determined the consistent behavior of smoking include:

  • Engaging in smoking more than seven times in one week.
  • Tendency to smoke more than one cigarette on various occasions.
  • Lack of processes initiated by the smoker to stop or quit smoking.
  • Smoking in public in various occasions.

These pointers made me realize that I do not just smoke a lot but also enjoy smoking or ravel at the opportunity to enjoy a cigarette. In this regard, I am in the first stages of cigarette smoking addiction. My desire is to stop my cigarette smoking behavior and engage in more healthy practices. This decision emanated from the vast array information and statistical data that came to my knowledge regarding the harmful effects of cigarette smoking on human health such as lung cancer. As such, I decided to come up with a plan and guide to stopping my dangerous smoking habit.

Healthy Behavior Plan-how to stop Smoking Cigarette

Plan

The first step in my plan to stop cigarette smoking was to develop a plan that restricted my chances or opportunities of smoking. My plan entailed activities such as:

  • Getting rid of all cigarettes stored in my place of residence and at any other location.
  • Informing my friends to discourage me from smoking or purchasing cigarettes.
  • Informing my local vendors of the potential risks of smoking to my health and encouraging them not to sell me cigarettes.
  • Avoiding smoking zones or activities and situations that usually caused me to smoke.

Guide

The next step in my plan to stop cigarette smoking was to develop a formidable guide to help in my desire to stop smoking and improve my health. Based on this understanding, my guideline entailed the following activities and routines:

  • Changing my diet to avoid the consumption of nicotine as it only reinforces my need for cigarette smoking.
  • Including healthier foods and drinks in my diet.
  • Exercising four times during the week with the forms of exercises including body resistance and fat burning exercises.
  • Visiting the doctor for body check-ups on a regular basis to ascertain the best of action in attaining a healthier body.
  • Attending support groups occasionally to engage in positive conversations with people who quit smoking and obtain advice from them on how best to approach the situation.
  • Refraining from visiting or staying in places whereby people smoke.

Timeline-how to stop Smoking Cigarette

I know that getting rid of a behavior of habit such smoking can be quite difficult since it is quite addictive. I have tried to quit smoking in the past but found myself slipping back to my old habit. I can attribute the failure to lack of a proper plan and guide, as well as, seeking instantaneous results rather than going through a protracted step-by-step process. Based on this understanding, I came up with a suitable timeline to meet my objective of stopping cigarette smoking

Activities Duration
§  Getting rid of all cigarettes stored in my place of residence and at any other location. 1 day
§  Informing my local vendors of the potential risks of smoking to my health and encouraging them not to sell me cigarettes. 2 days
§  Attending support groups occasionally to engage in positive conversations with people who quit smoking and obtain advice from them on how best to approach the situation. 4 weeks
§  Exercising four times during the week with the forms of exercises including body resistance and fat burning exercises. 4 weeks
§  Visiting the doctor for body check-ups on a regular basis to ascertain the best of action in attaining a healthier body. 2 weeks
§  Evaluating the progress of my activities and actions. 4 weeks

 

 

Scholarly Journal Articles

Gabble, R., Babayan, A., DiSante, E., & Schwartz, R. (2015). Smoking Cessation Interventions for Youth: A Review of the Literature. Toronto: Ontario Tobacco Research Unit.

The report by Gabble, Babayan, DiSante and Schwartz (2015) explores the prevailing state of knowledge regarding promising and effective practices and interventions in addressing the abandonment of smoking habit or demeanor among youth. It also reviews academic literature with the aim of determining the efficient and suitable interventions for helping the youth to stop smoking, as well as, the factors that influence the success of these interventions. The findings of the research conducted by Gabble, Babayan, DiSante and Schwartz (2015) are vital to my health behavior evaluation.How to stop Smoking Cigarette

This article is vital to my health evaluation as the evidence provided by Gabble, Babayan, DiSante and Schwartz (2015) brings to light the need for tobacco control programs to take an inclusive approach in fostering smoking cessation among youth. Moreover, there is a wider need for cross-organizational and multi-sector collaboration to curb the vast array of factors affecting the use of tobacco and abandonment of smoking in young individuals. Gabble, Babayan, DiSante and Schwartz (2015) also provide certain recommendations that can help any individual struggling with tobacco addiction. For instance, programs fostering smoking cessation should strive to include health professionals such as nurses and physicians, as well as, teachers, parents and counselors. Also, interventions or strategies of helping smokers stop their smoking habit should be supplemented by policy and legislative efforts to discourage the use of tobacco among youth. However, as a result of the renowned, severe and recurrent risks of smoking, it is of grave prominence for people to continue researching and developing ideal interventions and amicable policies to prevent more youth from developing smoking habits and provide the necessary assistance to those who are already smoking so that they can cease smoking.

Jesus, M. C., Silva, M. H., Cordeiro, S. M., Kortchmar, E., Zampier, V. S., & Merighi, M. A. (2016). Understanding unsuccessful attempts to quit smoking: A social phenomenology approach. Revista Da Escola De Enfermagem Da USP,50(1), 71-78. doi:10.1590/s0080-623420160000100010

According to Jesus et al. (2016), since tobacco addiction is a significant public health problem, smoking cessation has been increasingly addressed by various public policies over the last years. Based on the report by the World Health Organization, smoking is the leading cause of preventable demises of people in the entire world. Men and individuals with low education levels form the majority of smokers. Concerns regarding rampant smoking-related deaths and damages to people’s health has caused a shift in social paradigm with more people looking toward discerning what makes it difficult for people to stop their smoking habits. International literature on smoking cessation brings to light the high rate of attempts by people to quit smoking or their addiction to tobacco. For instance, in Brazil, female smokers are shown to make more attempts than their male counterparts to quit smoking.

As Jesus et al. (2016) denote, the high number of attempts by smokers to stop their smoking habits and the unsurprisingly low rate of success points toward a gap between the need for people and institutions to promote a reduction in their utilization of tobacco and the mechanisms or means available to attain this goal. The main point that the authors derive from this statement is that abandoning a smoking habit or demeanor can be an extremely difficult experience since the dependence entails a set of cognitive, physiological, behavioral and social phenomena that prevent most smokers from being successful in their attempts to quit smoking. The aim of the research conducted by Jesus et al. (2016) was to explore and discern the experiences of smokers in light of the unsuccessful attempts to stop smoking.

This article is vital to my health evaluation as the evidence provided by Jesus et al. (2016) is crucial to comprehending the strategies and approaches of intervention utilized by health professionals, especially nurses to support individuals attempting to quit their smoking habits. Moreover, the study revealed the smokers reported increased utilization of smoking cessation strategies learned or taught in support groups, but also relied on specialized psychological support. When it comes to the reasons for unsuccessful attempts by people to quit smoking Jesus et al. (2016) found that such failure is related to addiction to tobacco and people viewing cigarettes as suitable supports for coping with the stressful situations of everyday life.

Masefield, S., Powell, P., Jiménez-Ruiz, C., Hajek, P., Lewis, K., Andreas, S., . . . Fletcher, M. (2016). Recommendations to improve smoking cessation outcomes from people with lung conditions who smoke. ERJ Open Research,2(2), 00009-2016. doi:10.1183/23120541.00009-2016

According to Masefield et al. (2016), cigarette smoking results in more than six hundred and fifty thousand premature demises in Europe each year. There is a further estimate of one billion individuals perishing worldwide due to smoke-related complications in the 21st century. Smoking habits are listed in health facilities as the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with projections or forecasts that by the end of 2020, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be listed as the fifth cause of disability and third cause of death worldwide. In as much as only fifteen percent of the entire world’s population reside in Europe, the demographic is characterized by approximately one third of maladies associated with tobacco, and subsequent colossal impacts on healthcare services and national economies.

Masefield et al. (2016) believe that the effect of lung disease and the number of premature demises on symptom control and quality of life can be decreased through raising awareness of the value and importance of smoking cessation to individuals with lung conditions, for instance, asthma, COPD and lung cancer. Based on this understanding, smoking cessation is presented in this article as the only effective means or strategy of controlling the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, despite this knowledge, individuals with COPD still continue to smoke which makes it difficult to reach out to them and help them quit smoking effectively. The objectives of the research conducted by Masefield et al. (2016) were to explore and fathom the features of individuals across Europe living with lung conditions such as asthma, COPD and lung cancer and currently smoke. The study also explored the perceptions of these people of smoking cessation treatments and services, their encounters and conversations with healthcare professionals and their recommendations for the improvement of the outcomes of quitting smoking.How to stop Smoking Cigarette

This article is vital to my health evaluation as the evidence provided by Masefield et al. (2016) emanates from the European Respiratory Society in conjunction with the European Lung Foundation. Based on the results of the study, the article presents specific recommendations that are pertinent to my health behavior evaluation. These recommendations include sufficient discourse of patient’s smoking perceptions, motivation and demeanors, discerning addiction, treatment options, earlier intervention, providing constructive advice and making informed decisions.

Evaluation

I not only followed my plan but also my guide and timeline to the latter. Previously, my attempts at quitting cigarette smoking were unsuccessful due to the lack of a proper plan, guide and timeline. However, I tool a discordant approach this time by forming a good plan, a detailed guide and comfortable timeline so that I did not feel the pressure of stopping cigarette smoking in a short time and not having ample time to deal with the withdrawal symptoms. My timeline worked perfectly as it allowed me sufficient time to undertake all the activities, meet all the appointments and attend all the meetings.

In as much as noting my progress in the journal entries was fulfilling, I found the espouse I got from friends, families and work colleagues to be extremely gratifying. From the moment I informed them about my goals to stop smoking and outlined my objectives, they came on board and provided the support I needed and advice to help me achieve my goal. I must admit that secondary smoking was a challenge as it almost made me veer away from my target and objectives, but I pulled through and stayed the course.

I am proud of myself for the far that I have reached in my effort to stop cigarette smoking completely. I have made significant changes in my diet and exercising routine that have brought nothing but positive impacts on my health. However, I know that journey is not done and the task of maintaining my changed behavior still exists. That is why I plan on maintain my plan, guide and timeline that were already designed for one month to continue running for the foreseeable future.

 

 

 

References

Gabble, R., Babayan, A., DiSante, E., & Schwartz, R. (2015). Smoking Cessation Interventions for Youth: A Review of the Literature. Toronto: Ontario Tobacco Research Unit.

Jesus, M. C., Silva, M. H., Cordeiro, S. M., Kortchmar, E., Zampier, V. S., & Merighi, M. A. (2016). Understanding unsuccessful attempts to quit smoking: A social phenomenology approach. Revista Da Escola De Enfermagem Da USP,50(1), 71-78. doi:10.1590/s0080-623420160000100010

Masefield, S., Powell, P., Jiménez-Ruiz, C., Hajek, P., Lewis, K., Andreas, S., . . . Fletcher, M. (2016). Recommendations to improve smoking cessation outcomes from people with lung conditions who smoke. ERJ Open Research,2(2), 00009-2016. doi:10.1183/23120541.00009-2016