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Health Assessment Outcome

When I took the health assessment, my goal was to discover a health problem that was crucial enough to cause significant health complications later in life. I expected to find out if I had certain signs or symptoms of fatal maladies such as cancer, heart problems, diabetes, or kidney failure. I come from a family whereby due to the lifestyle we lead and the foods and drinks we consume, a considerable number of my extended family members have been diagnosed with diabetes and kidney failure. They live with these conditions and have to undergo dialysis each week which can be a daunting and gruesome experience. Based on my research about these maladies, I discovered that individual members of the family could be vulnerable to these illnesses due to hereditary factors. Thus, when I conducted the health assessment, a significant objective was to ascertain whether the genes I share with my family could cause me to have diabetes or kidney failure. Nonetheless, I discovered that I had an entirely distinct health problem that emanated from an unfortunate habit.

The results of the health assessment revealed that I was prone to lung cancer and other breathing complications due to my cigarette smoking. I insisted that I did not have a cigarette smoking problem, but specific pointers made me realize that the results of the health assessment were valid. For instance, I frequently smoke each week, especially during weekdays, I tend to smoke more than one cigarette every time I engage in smoking, and I have a carefree smoking habit whereby I do not feel the need to smoke privately or hide my smoking. These attributes of my cigarette smoking were sufficient to convince me that I indeed had a smoking problem that was detrimental to my health. Since I do not want to get lung cancer or breathing complications, my desire is to quit cigarette smoking through the application of a clear plan, guide, and timeline.

Plan-health Assessment Outcome

The framework of my plan to stop cigarette smoking will entail the following activities and resolutions:

  • Identifying the things and habits that caused me to engage in cigarette smoking such as partying and stress and avoiding them.
  • Removing all cigarettes in my house, at the workplace and other places so as not to be tempted to engage in smoking.
  • Requesting my family members, friends and workmates to help me stop my cigarette smoking habit by not purchasing cigarettes for me and offering advice.
  • Requesting my cigarette supplier to prevent me from buying cigarettes from him even if I make a desperate request.

Health Guide-health Assessment Outcome

When it comes to my health guide, my goal entailed not only quitting smoking but also engaging in other healthy behaviors to reduce my risk of developing lung cancer and other breathing complications. As such, the framework of my guide involved the following changes and activities:

  • Altering my diet from the fat-filled foods and drinks, I consume regularly and consuming healthier drinks and food instead.
  • Going for regular body check-ups at the local health facility to determine whether my progress in healthy living and demeanor has decreased my risk of developing lung cancer, breathing complications and cardiovascular diseases.
  • Engaging in regular exercises such as running, as well as, recreational and sporting activities such as soccer to keep me fit.
  • Identifying salient support groups involving individuals who have surmounted their smoking habits and attending meetings to obtain appropriate advice and espouse for dealing with my smoking habit.

Timeline-health Assessment Outcome

The most crucial part of my decision to quit smoking was the time I allocated myself to achieve this goal. I had not attempted to stop cigarette smoking before, but from the narrations of others who tried to quit smoking, I realized that it was a daunting task since most of them kept returning to their old smoking ways. These narrations were backed by evidence from the literature that reiterated the failure of many people who attempted to quit smoking. Thus, I knew that to be successful in my goal of quitting cigarette smoking, I had to accord myself ample time to undertake all the activities and resolutions in my plan and guide. Based on this understanding, I came up with the following timeline that entailed the duration I took to accomplish each activity and at which frequency in a timespan of one and a half months.

Resolutions and Activities Duration/Frequency
§  Requesting my cigarette supplier to prevent me from buying cigarettes from him even if I make a desperate request. One day
§  Engaging in regular exercises such as running, as well as, recreational and sporting activities such as soccer to keep me fit. Six weeks
§  Removing all cigarettes in my house, at the workplace and other places so as not to be tempted to engage in smoking. Three days
§  Identifying salient support groups involving individuals who have surmounted their smoking habits and attending meetings to obtain appropriate advice and espouse for dealing with my smoking habit. Six weeks
§  Going for regular body check-ups at the local health facility to determine whether my progress in healthy living. Three weeks
§  Assessing the progress and outcomes of my resolutions and activities.Health Assessment Outcome Six weeks

 

Smoking Scholarly Journal Articles

Brose, L. S., West, R., Mcdermott, M. S., Fidler, J. A., Croghan, E., & Mcewen, A. (2011). What makes for an effective stop-smoking service? Thorax,66(10), 924-926. doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2011-200251

According to Brose et al. (2011), the stop-smoking services network is one of the most valued life-preserving clinical interventions in the National Health Service of the United Kingdom. The intervention is also renowned internationally. Nonetheless, the success rate of the technique in smoking cessation varies substantially across discordant services, making it prominent to explore the factors that influence the effectiveness of the success stories. Based on the research conducted by Brose et al. (2011), tobacco smoking is estimated to result in five million premature demises every year and is also the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. The study also found that the success rates of individuals who attempted to quit smoking devoid of support are meager with the portion standing at five percent. Fortunately, there are effective strategies of effective cigarette smoking cessation that Brose et al. (2011) bring to light such as varenicline and bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy and behavioral support. A significant smoking cessation intervention that the United Kingdom has adopted massively is the country’s national network of stop-smoking services that accords a combination of behavioral support and medication.

This article is vital to my health behavior assessment and evaluation when it comes to quitting cigarette smoking as Brose et al. (2011) found that smokers attending groups organized and run by specialists utilizing a combination of varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy stand a better chance of experiencing success. On the other hand, smokers receiving treatment in primary care without any support system or the application of nicotine replacement therapy stand a lesser chance of success. Nonetheless, the most efficient forms of interventions are uncommon due to the distinct preferences of people engaged in cigarette smoking. In most situations, smokers seeking to stop their smoking habit tend to prefer going through the process alone, that is, making a resolution to quit smoking and going about the process on their own. Notwithstanding, as Brose et al. (2011) show in their study, such individuals are usually not successful in their smoking cessation attempts. Thus, the main point that this article outlines is that smokers with the objective of stopping their smoking habit stand a better chance of success when they obtain salient support irrespective of the interventions they are using, be it the network of stop-smoking services in the UK, varenicline and bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy and behavioral support.

Kotz, D., & West, R. (2009). Explaining the social gradient in smoking cessation: It’s not in the trying, but in the succeeding. Tobacco Control,18(1), 43-46. doi:10.1136/tc.2008.025981

Smokers emanating from disadvantaged backgrounds or deprived socioeconomic groups tend to experience immense difficulty quitting cigarette smoking. Based on this understanding, Kotz and West (2009) investigated the extent of the impact of deprived socioeconomic backgrounds of smokers on their smoking cessation attempts in England, as well as, their utilization of aids to cessation. The research conducted by the authors entailed a survey of six thousand nine hundred and fifty respondents of sixteen years of age and above who had smoked in the previous year and four hundred and sixty-nine respondents who had stopped smoking at the time of the survey. From the results of the survey, Kotz and West (2009) found that socioeconomic discordances in the rates of smoking cessation cannot be linked to lower chances of smokers embarking on a quest to quits smoking or their utilization of aids to quit smoking. Moreover, the results indicated that more deprived smokers tended to be involved with public health messages regarding smoking even though their smoking cessation attempts are less likely to be successful. However, this is just a portion of the results since the overall findings indicate that there is no substantial relation between socioeconomic backgrounds and smoking cessation.Health Assessment Outcome

This article is vital to my health behavior assessment and evaluation when it comes to quitting cigarette smoking as Kotz and West (2009) show that there is no significant relationship between a person’s socioeconomic background and his or her attempt to quit cigarette smoking or use of smoking cessation aids. One can argue that a smoker from a low-income household and deprived neighborhood may find it difficult to access some of the aids crucial to quitting cigarette smoking. This statement is right to some extent as such aid resources may be limited. However, the decision to attempt smoking cessation does not depend on one’s socioeconomic background. This insight made me realize that I have been giving excuses for not quitting smoking rather than taking action.

Lichtenstein, E., Zhu, S., & Tedeschi, G. J. (2010). Smoking cessation quitlines: An underrecognized intervention success story. American Psychologist,65(4), 252-261. doi:10.1037/a0018598

According to Lichtenstein, Zhu, and Tedeschi (2010), quitlines refer to the telephone-based programs or systems initiated to help tobacco users stop their smoking habits. Once smokers contact the quitlines, they receive support in the form of recorded messages, a callback from a counselor, mailed materials, counseling when a person calls and providing access to medication. The authors present the case for quitlines as an effective way of helping tobaccos users quit smoking due to its advantages. For instance, quitlines are convenient since the provision of counseling services via telephones reduces the logistical barricades to treatment while also improving the utilization of counseling services by smokers. Moreover, should the clients require additional counseling they can call back and obtain more advice from the quitlines. Thus, this intervention is not a one-time affair.

Second, contrary to face-to-face counseling that many smokers may dread due to their protracted nature and lack of anonymity, quitlines are appropriate since their counseling sessions tend to progress swiftly. Moreover, the semi-anonymous aspect of quitlines renders them ideal for candid discourses that aid the counselors to get a clearer picture of the level of smoking addiction of the callers in a short period. The third advantage of quitlines is that telephone channels enable counselors to offer proactive counseling whereby the counselor calls the client or smoker to provide appropriate help, thus, improving the likelihood of follow-up sessions. Apart from its reduction of attrition, proactive counseling facilitated by quitlines also increase social support and accountability. The final advantage of quitlines that Lichtenstein, Zhu, and Tedeschi (2010) outline is that the telephone aspect of this intervention or method of fostering smoking cessation makes it easy to apply the permissible content for each session. However, the counseling sessions are still quite focused, thorough and brief; attributes ideal for large-scale application.

This article is vital to my health behavior assessment and evaluation when it comes to quitting cigarette smoking as Lichtenstein, Zhu, and Tedeschi (2010) explore and summarize the content, empirical status, development, structure and prevailing reach of smoking cessation quitlines. Most times, people who are addicted to stimulants and drugs need someone to talk to and share their struggles. The quitlines provide meet this vital need and help smokers quit their cigarette smoking habits through the provision of counseling when these people need it most.

Health Progress and Outcomes Evaluation-health Assessment Outcome

I was successful in attaining my objective of quitting cigarette smoking, and I owe this outcome to certain reasons. First, I designed a plan and guide to help me accomplish my goal. I read that the reason most people fail in their attempts to quit smoking is their lack of prior preparation in the form of having a suitable framework to guide them in their smoking cessation. Based on this understanding, I listed all the resolutions and activities that were crucial to smoking cessation and found it less challenging to quit smoking since I had a point of reference.

Second, I had a remarkable timeline that I followed to the latter. Impatience can be a major cause of failure when it comes to smoking cessation. From the health assessment, conversations with previous smokers and literature about smoking, I learned that people who want immediate results in their smoking cessation attempts failed and went back to smoking. In this regard, I came up with a timeline that accorded men sufficient time to engage in all the activities necessary for quitting smoking. Following this timeline diligently made the experience of quitting smoking more bearable and successful.

Third, the help and support I received from the support group I attended, as well as, my workmates, family, and friends went a long way in helping me cope with the withdrawal symptoms and stay on track to achieving my objective of quitting cigarette smoking. If it were not for the support of these people, I could have ended up engaging in cigarette smoking again. Thus, I appreciate the impact they had on my smoking cessation journey by always encouraging me and upbraiding me when I needed it.

I am proud to say that I have significantly reduced my risk of developing lung cancer and other breathing complications by successfully quitting cigarette smoking. Moreover, I have adopted a healthy diet involving nutritious foods and drinks. I hope that I will maintain this healthier lifestyle and never go back to engaging in the unhealthy demeanor or habit of cigarette smoking.Health Assessment Outcome

 

 

References

Brose, L. S., West, R., Mcdermott, M. S., Fidler, J. A., Croghan, E., & Mcewen, A. (2011). What makes for an effective stop-smoking service? Thorax,66(10), 924-926. doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2011-200251

Kotz, D., & West, R. (2009). Explaining the social gradient in smoking cessation: It’s not in the trying, but in the succeeding. Tobacco Control,18(1), 43-46. doi:10.1136/tc.2008.025981

Lichtenstein, E., Zhu, S., & Tedeschi, G. J. (2010). Smoking cessation quitlines: An underrecognized intervention success story. American Psychologist,65(4), 252-261. doi:10.1037/a0018598