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Do action films cause people to eat more popcorn during a movie?

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Description

Do action films cause people to eat more popcorn during a movie?

Introduction

Experimental research is conducted often to test hypothesis and prove or disapprove a claim. For this research, the main reason was to investigate the effect of different films on people’s feeding habits. More specifically, most people have popcorn as the preferred snack when watching a film but some rarely notice the amounts of popcorn they consume during a movie.

Hypothesis and variables

The hypothesis for this research was People watching action films are more likely to eat more popcorn than those watching slower films. The independent variable is one that is changed to test the effects on the dependent variable (Helmenstine, 2018). In this study, the independent variable was the different films shown. The dependent variable is the variable being tested (Helmenstine, 2018). In this study, the dependent variables was the popcorn intake. When the film as changed, it affected the amount of popcorn taken by participants.

Methodology-do action films cause people to eat more popcorn during a movie?

Two independent groups were used for this experiment. All the participants were college attending male students between the ages of 18-25 years. No pretest was conducted. Extraneous variables were controlled in a number of ways. All the participants picked were male and of the same age so that the feeding patterns were not different. The popcorn fed to each group was fresh so that no group ate stale popcorn. Stale popcorn is not as tasty thus feeding one group stale popcorn would mean a corruption of results because they may not eat as much. The experiment was conducted after all the participants have been fed a common meal of three pizza slices and a 500ml soft drink of their choice. The common meal was effective in preventing the participants from overeating or eating different nutritional value foods which would influence their snacking habits. For example, if some participants had more protein filed meals they may not eat as much popcorn as their counterparts. This study used a true experimental design as all the participants were randomly assigned groups. The experiment used two groups each containing 5 participants. One group was assigned to watch an action film while the other watched a documentary film. All the participants were given a big tub of fresh popcorn before their movie began for snacking purposes as well as to test the hypothesis that; People watching action films are more likely to eat more popcorn than those watching slower films.

Results

The group watching the documentary all had remainders of popcorn in their tubs. However, all the participants in the group watching the action film had eaten all their popcorn.

Action Film Documentary Film
5 Empty popcorn tubs 3 half full tubs

2 quarter full popcorn tubs

 

Discussion and Conclusion-do action films cause people to eat more popcorn during a movie?

This study confirmed the results from similar studies by finding that people who watched action films snack more compared to those watching slower films. The results can be explained by the effects of distraction on human feeding patterns. Distracted humans are less likely to pay attention to what they are eating and thus end up eating more (Mathur & Stevenson, 2015). The group watching the action film was more distracted because of the fast-paced action in the film as well as easily changing scenes. The group watching a documentary, however, was less distracted and therefore more conscious of what they ate. In conclusion, the film’s distraction determines the participants’ feeding patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Helmenstine, T. (2018). Understand the difference between independent and dependent variables. Retrieved 22 November 2019, from https://www.thoughtco.com/independent-and-dependent-variables-differences-606115

Mathur, U., & Stevenson, R. (2015). Television and eating: repetition enhances food intake. Frontiers in Psychology6. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01657