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Comparison of the Tone of ‘Oryx and Crake’ and ‘The Road’

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STYLE ANALYSIS

OUTLINE FOR PAIRED PASSAGES

 

 

PARAGRAPH SENTENCE CONTENT
Paragraph 1:

Introduction

#1 thesis:  it names both pieces and states the tone/attitude of the first and the tone/attitude of the second. (Each piece will have one clear tone that differs from the other piece.)
#2-3 These elaborate on the ideas in sentence #1.
Paragraph 2:

Diction analysis

#1 topic sentence; it includes the word  diction and gives commentary about both pieces.
#2 concrete detail:  it includes 3 diction quotations from the first passage.
#3 commentary about 1 or 2 of the quotes in sentence #2
#4 commentary about 1 or 2 of the quotes in sentence #2
#5 another concrete detail:  it includes 3 diction quotations from the second passage.
#6 commentary about 1 or 2 of the quotes in sentence #5
#7 commentary about 1 or 2 of the quotes in sentence #5
#8 concluding sentence for the diction paragraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paragraph 3:

Detail Analysis

#1 Topic sentence; it includes the word detail and gives commentary about both passages
#2 Concrete detail: it includes 2 detail quotations from the first passage
#3 Commentary about 1 of the quotes in sentence #2
#4 Commentary about the second quote in sentence #2
#5 Another concrete detail: it includes 2 detail quotations from the second passage.
#6 Commentary about 1 of the quotes in sentence #5
#7 Commentary about the second quote in sentence #5
#8 Concluding sentence for the detail paragraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paragraph 4:

Point of View Analysis

#1 Topic sentence; it includes the phrase point of view and gives commentary about both pieces.
#2 Concrete detail: it includes 2 point of view quotations from the first passage
#3 Commentary about 1 of the quotes in sentence #2
#4 Commentary about the second quote in sentence #2
#5 Another concrete detail: it includes 2 point of view quotations from the second passage.
#6 Commentary about 1 of the quotes in sentence #5
#7 Commentary about the second quote in sentence #5
#8 Concluding sentence for the point of view paragraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paragraph #5: organization analysis #1 topic sentence; it includes the word organization and gives commentary about both pieces.
#2 concrete detail: it summarizes or paraphrases the beginning, the middle, and the end of the first passage.
#3 commentary about sentence #2
#4 commentary that says why the author structures the passage this way
#5 another concrete detail: it summarizes or paraphrases the beginning, the middle, and the end of the second passage.
#6 commentary about sentence #5
#7 commentary that says why the author structures the passage this way
#8 concluding sentence for the organization paragraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paragraph #6:

syntax analysis

#1 topic sentence; it includes the word syntax and gives commentary about both passages.
#2 concrete detail: it describes the syntax at the beginning, middle, and end of the first passage.
#3 commentary about sentence #2
#4 commentary that says why the author uses this syntax in this passage
#5 another concrete detail: it describes the syntax at the beginning, middle, and end of the second passage
#6 commentary about sentence #5
#7 commentary that says why the author uses this syntax in this passage
#8 concluding sentence for the syntax paragraph

 

Paragraph #7:

concluding paragraph

#1 the first sentence in the concluding paragraph; it gives final commentary thoughts about the entire essay.
#2-3 these sentences elaborate on the ideas stated in sentence #1 of the conclusion and give a finished feeling to the essay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category:

Description

In Margaret Atwood’s, Oryx and Crake the main character Snowman is depicted as being lonely and bored. In the other paragraph, from Cormac McCarthy, The Road, a father expresses despair after seeing the way the earth has been reduced into a less valuable substance, completely different from its original form. This essay does a comparative analysis of the tone used in the two texts from the selected paragraphs.

Both Atwood and McCarthy make use of diction that aims at explaining and expounding on the tones represented in their respective texts. While McCarthy remains formal in his diction, Atwood is a bit relaxed in her usage of words, coming across as informal at times. For instance, in Oryx and Crake, Atwood says Snowman “can make no such assumptions”, because he “has no future,” except the one “he can imagine of the past” (Atwood 41). Atwood’s choice of diction help to create the image of a totally bored and lonely Snowman, who cannot dare make assumptions because he has no future, except the one he can imagine. On the other hand, McCarthy talks of a “world shrinking” and “the name of things slowly following those things into oblivion” (McCarthy 75). Here, the diction help explain the despair and hopelessness of the farther because of what he witnessed while undertaking his journey. The world had truly been altered in irreversible ways. Overall, McCarthy’s diction strikes for being highly formal, while that of Atwood remains to some extent informal.

While both authors are keen to explain matters into detail, Atwood’s description of Snowman is highly detailed that McCarthy’s description of the wandering father. Atwood says of Snowman: “he too is a castaway of sorts” and that “he could make lists” (Atwood 41). This serves to offer a description of Snowman as being a lone to the extent of being a “castaway of sorts.” Further detail is revealed when Atwood goes further in the description of her characters as being able to “make lists,” obviously because of finding himself being too idle as a result of not having much to do. In The Road, McCarthy states that everything had actually changed, including “colors” and “names of birds” (McCarthy 75). These offer a detailed description about the state of the earth, as it appeared in the eyes of the wandering father as he took an odyssey with his son. In comparison, Atwood’s description of Snowman offers more detail than that of McCarthy, though both do a good job in their attempts to lay bare some details about their characters.

In both paragraphs from the two books, each author makes an effort to pass along their point of view through the perceptions of their characters. In their respective tone settings, the authors communicate their points of view – Atwood offers her critiques of modern society while McCarthy shares the fantasies of traveling as well as the destruction that human lay of the environment. By saying that Snowman “could make lists” while “Craker’s can’t read,” Atwood aimed to take a swipe of the modern society which entertains a culture where people immerse themselves in a lonely life doing things that only they understand (Atwood 41). On the other hand, McCarthy talks of a “shrinking world” that is “more fragile than he would have thought