Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography: The effects of integrating mobile devices with teaching and learning on students’ learning performance: A meta-analysis and research synthesis.

Sung, Y., Chang, K., & Liu, T. (2016). The effects of integrating mobile devices with teaching and learning on students’ learning performance: A meta-analysis and research synthesis. Science Direct. Retrieved 6 November 2017.

Summary

The purpose of the study was to establish the effects of integrating mobile devises such as laptops, mobile phones and personal digital assistants in the classrooms and outdoors. The study performed a meta-analysis and research synthesis on the effects of integrated use of mobile devices in teaching and learning. The study revealed that students used laptops to finish their assignments, do homework and take notes. Those connected to wireless platforms were better received. The use of mobile devices however did not achieve a higher-level of thinking among peers. Laptops and mobiles where mostly used for searches, communication and expression. They are advantageous because they can be used in fixed environments and in any other environment. Data was collected through manual and electronic searches.

Assessment

Schools that integrated the use of these mobile technologies performed better in grade point averages than those that did not. ‘Traditional’ schools need to take up this new learning method because today’s children are more exposed to the internet and media where they learn a great deal. So why not tap into that for the best?

Conclusion

The young people of today are content with mobility; they cannot stay in one place for too long and will need to study on the go. Mobile avenues for learning may be best for outdoor learning when they are not in their classrooms with their instructors. Advice however will help them not to use technology for entertainment purely but to benefit from them also.

Annotated Bibliography: A Qualitative Explorative Study about the Introduction of Tablet Devices in Secondary Education

References

Montrieux, H., Vanderlinde, R., Schellens, T., & De Marez, L. (2015). Teaching and Learning with Mobile Technology: A Qualitative Explorative Study about the Introduction of Tablet Devices in Secondary Education. Retrieved 6 November 2017.

Summary

This paper investigated the perceptions of teachers and students concerning the use of tablets for teaching and learning opportunities. A qualitative focus group was used in the secondary school where each teacher and student were given a tablet at the beginning of the school year for use both at school and at home. The school was the first to do so in Belgium so it was basically experimental. Qualitative research was used on six focus groups of 10 students each. Semi structured interviews were used to assess the students. They found out that students had to be taught how to use the mobile technologies in a responsible way, not to cheat or use for entertainment purposes only. The students faced distraction a lot from the tablets. Learning became less dull after the introduction of the technology. It facilitated a shift from learning by heart to learning by multimedia.

Assessment

A classroom setting can get dull at times, the introduction of tablets made learning less dull and more interactive Students were fascinated by the ‘book behind glass’. It may sound funny but today’s generation can’t get enough of staring of screens. The interest never fades away and every day is a new opportunity to learn more from a more exciting source. Tablets definitely filled the void about ensuring that the students studied at home as well.

Conclusion

Students and mobile technologies are inseparable so why not make learning fun so that they can improve their grades without making them struggle as much. Teachers also appreciate the new developments as they teach and students absorb faster.

Annotated Bibliography: The Impact of Mobile Learning on ESP Learners’ Performance

Alkhezzi, F. (2016). The impact of Mobile Learning on ESP Learners Performance. Files.eric.ed.gov. Retrieved 6 November 2017, fromhttp://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1106736.pdf

Summary

The purpose of this study was to research on the impacts of using mobile technology applications to learn the English language on an ESP level. It looked at the learners’ ability to use the right grammar and whether or not their writing skills improved. The mobile application used was Telegram Messenger. The participants were 40 undergraduates studying at AHS, Kuwait University. An experimental research design was conducted to test the use of mobile applications on learning vocabulary, grammar and writing quizzes. The experiment was conducted for 12 weeks and tests were carried out after every 6 weeks. The results showed that students learnt better outside the classrooms and continued to improve and build on their vocabulary. The Results indicated that mobile technology substantially improved the students’ ability to master grammar and pass their quizzes.

Assessment

Although grammar was greatly improved, their writing skills did not receive the same boost. I am concerned that there may be a gap that was not effectively addressed between the traditional face to face classroom interactions and the use of mobile applications. Ideally the two are supposed to go hand in hand. Good grammar is supposed to translate into good writing because there is an improvement in new words that are learnt and the students in the process also learn how to use them correctly.

Conclusion

Traditional methods of instruction are still useful and cannot be replaced with mobile technology. The two complement each other and should be further developed  to integrate them together to achieve best results. Mobile applications such as Telegram Messenger are excellent because they can be used outside the classroom.