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Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography
The main topics and themes covered in the article “Interactive writing in a primary classroom” by Kathryn Button, Margaret J Johnson and Paige Furgerson are reading and writing in a classroom context within the early stages of learning (Button, Johnson, & Furgerson, 1996).
The main arguments from the article are that interactive writing is imperative for the development of language skills, especially passing down instruction related to phonics and syntax within the context of meaningful textual analysis.
The authors employ a descriptive methodology which relies heavily on the qualitative analysis of secondary data. For instance, the authors examine information from Ohio State University in figure 1 and 2 in a bid to reinforce their argument.
The main point of this article is that learners should be introduced to the concept of interactive writing early enough so that they can be able to master language skills by benefiting from both reading and writing, as instructed through several texts studied at these elementary levels of learning.
I someone asked what this article is about, in a nutshell, I would say that it instructs on the best way that educators can use to help their students acquire and retain language skills, which is through interactive writing, which is basically facilitating early interactions with texts to fasten language skills acquisition.
This source is useful since it sheds some more light in the attempt to answer my research questions, by explaining exactly the role – and to what extent – interactive learning aids in teaching language to young students.
The information is reliable because it relies of secondary sources that are reputable. Besides, it relies on studies conducted earlier before arriving at its conclusion. The information contained in figure 1 and 2 further add to its credibility.

Reference
Button, K., Johnson, J. M., & Furgerson, P. (1996). Interactive writing in a primary classroom. The Reading Teacher, Vol 49, No 6 , 446-454.